Courses

  • GMS FC 702: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences II: Structure and Function of the Genome
    The second module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of biological processes that influence the inheritance, regulation, and utilization of genes. Genetic and genomic, molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 703: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences III: Architecture and Dynamics of the Cell
    The third module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the movement of proteins and membranes with the cell, the secretory process, the cytoskeletal framework of the cell and the resulting cell-cell interaction and communication with the matrix. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed to-wards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Science. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 704: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences IV: Mechanisms of Cell Communication
    The fourth module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of cell communication. This module will begin by discussing overarching concepts before examining the specific types of molecules that initiate and transduce signals. Examples of cell signaling and subsequent cellular responses will then be considered in different contexts to provide a framework on which future learning can be applied. As the module progresses, the complexity of the systems explored will increase from individual cells to multicellular environments such as tissues, organs, and organisms. In addition, normal processes as well as the dysregulation of cell-cell communication is disease will be studied. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete progressive sequence. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 705: Translational Genetics and Genomics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will explore the process by which insights from basic science research ultimately lead to new strategies for patient care with a focus on examples from genetics and more recent genome-wide experimental approaches. The course will cover examples of translational research using genetic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, approaches in human and/or model systems. Research that leads to new approaches for establishing disease diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, and personalized medicine will be discussed. The ethical and societal implications of these developments will also be considered. 2cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 706: Molecular Metabolism
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This optional module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. The course will present an integrated view of biochemistry and the control of cellular and organismal functions with regard to nutrient utilization. Classes include small group discussions of key papers. Mechanisms that allow cells to survive variations in nutrient supply (starvation, feeding, nutrient excess/stress) and how these mechanisms contribute to metabolic derangements contribute to disease pathogenesis (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer) will be discussed. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 707: Physiology of Specialized Cells
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is one of the elective course modules (Module V) of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum. Knowledge of cellular and molecular physiology is critical to understanding the higher order of functioning of tissues, organs, and organs systems. The objective of the course is to discuss the specialized adaptations of cells that help them to function in their respective tissues and organs. This course will also provide a framework to bridge the gap between the biochemistry and the molecular and cellular biology that students have acquired in the core modules (I through IV) and organ physiology and pharmacology that will be addressed in the second year. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 708: Professional Development Skills
    This course introduces basic professional development skills for PhD students in the following areas:communication skills, research compliance/law/bioethics, and personal professional development.
  • GMS FC 762: Critical Thinking in Biomedical Research
    The primary goal of this course is to use the framework of the scientific literature to develop Critical Thinking Skills to generate novel hypotheses with a focus on establishing novel biological mechanisms and pathways. Critical Thinking skills will be used to examine research findings and theories to uncover inconsistencies, bias, or faulty logic. The student will be expected to build on their careful evaluation and analysis of the papers to create a novel hypothesis each week and design a single experiment to address their question. The weekly course discussion will be student led and this will facilitate the development of teaching skills. Generally the papers to be discussed will be an older, classic paper, which established an important new concept and a newer paper that builds on that theme. Grading is based on weekly participation in class discussions, presentations, and a concise final written assignment. 2cr, spring
  • GMS FC 952: Research in Cell & Molecular Biology
    Var cr
  • GMS FS 700: Criminal Law and Ethics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    An overview of legal, ethical and practical issues of forensic science, the impact of forensic science on the justice system and a discussion of traditional and emerging admissibility standards involving forensic science evidence is given. The curriculum will include a description of the roles law enforcement, attorneys and forensic scientists, professional standards for the practice of criminalistics and ethical issues in various forensic disciplines. 2 cr
  • GMS FS 701: Crime Scene Investigation
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This combination hands-on and lecture-based course will provide students with an in-depth review of crime scene assessment and management. Methods of identifying, documenting, collecting and packaging physical evidence from various types of crime scenes are discussed. A hands-on component will be employed in areas such as crime scene sketching, photography and pattern evidence collection. 3 cr
  • GMS FS 702: Forensic Biology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This lecture-based course will introduce students to the biological aspects of forensic evidence including biochemical and physical attributes of blood and other body fluids. Common methods of body fluid identification utilized in forensic laboratories will be discussed at length. Other topics include guidelines for thorough evidence examination, screening, documentation and report writing. 3 cr
  • GMS FS 703: Forensic Chemistry
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This lecture-based course will provide an introduction to forensic chemistry and will expose students to chemical principles and instrumental techniques associated with the field, with particular emphasis on the analysis of controlled substances and forensic toxicology. A review of organic and analytical chemistry as they relate to forensic investigations will be discussed. 3 cr
  • GMS FS 704: Forensic Biology Laboratory
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS FS 702 Forensic Biology (pre- or co-req)
    This laboratory-based course will give students an opportunity to apply the principles of forensic biology to actual samples. Techniques utilized will include chemical screening assays, detection with ALS, methods used to confirm the presence of specific biological materials, antibody interactions, and microscopic identification of cellular material. 2 cr
  • GMS FS 706: Pattern Evidence Analysis
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This combination lecture and lab-based course will provide students with overview of various types of pattern evidence with an emphasis on the systematic approaches to pattern evidence comparison and analysis. The history of fingerprint identification, fingerprint processing and comparison techniques, footwear and tire impression analysis, toolmark analysis, and the importance of photography in pattern evidence documentation will be discussed. Development of pattern evidence using mechanical, chemical and visual techniques is incorporated. 2 cr
  • GMS FS 707: Trace Evidence Analysis
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This lecture-based course will provide an overview of the principles and concepts on which trace evidence analysis is based. Proper collection, preservation, identification and comparison of items such as glass, paint, hairs and fibers, using standard methods and instruments used in crime scene laboratories will be discussed. 3 cr
  • GMS FS 708: Forensic Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS FS 703 Forensic Chemistry
    This laboratory course will provide an introduction to a variety of instrumentation and equipment utilized in the forensic laboratory and detail the methods used by forensic scientists for chemical analysis with a focus on forensic toxicology and drug chemistry. 2 cr
  • GMS FS 712: Forensic Pathology and Medicolegal Death Investigation
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This lecture-based course will provide the student with an overview of the role of the medical examiner and the basic principles of medicolegal death investigations. Specific lectures will cover autopsy procedures in the investigation of gunshot wounds, sharp and blunt trauma, drowning, asphyxia, child deaths, motor vehicle accidents and time since death determination. A general knowledge of anatomy is recommended prior to enrollment. 3 cr., Spring sem.
  • GMS FS 713: Bloodstain Pattern Analysis
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS FS 701 Crime Scene Investigation
    This lecture and lab-based course will provide students with fundamental knowledge in the area of bloodstain pattern analysis including the scientific principles and practical applications of bloodstain pattern analysis for forensic casework. The procedures and methods for recognition, documentation and evaluation of bloodstain patterns will be covered. Additionally, the principles of physics, blood dynamics and the geometric significance of bloodstain patterns will be explored. 2 cr
  • GMS FS 720: Molecular Biology of Forensic DNA Analysis
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This lecture-based course will discuss theory and application of human genetics and molecular biology to testing of biological evidence. DNA structure and organization of the human genome and types of genetic variation occurring in humans will be covered. Other topics include the history of DNA analysis and current PCR based methods for testing of autosomal STR loci, Y chromosome STR loci and mitochondrial DNA. Lecture material will also cover commonly encountered artifacts in PCR testing, DNA profile interpretation and statistical analysis of results. 3 cr