Courses

  • GMS FA 760: Research in Forensic Anthropology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is designed to facilitate the students' thesis research. Var cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FA 761: Research in Forensic Anthropology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is designed to facilitate the students' thesis research. Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FA 790: History, Method, and Theory in Biological Anthropology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will cover the theoretical and methodological principles of the major areas of biological anthropology. Initially focusing on the history of biological anthropology and evolutionary theory, the course will expand to cover skeletal biology, forensic anthropology, and contemporary human variation. The last section will address the philosophy of science and anthropology and practical issues such as presenting and publishing papers and preparing grant proposals. It is intended that this course provide students with a thorough understanding of the correlation between the developments of the discipline of biological anthropology, evolutionary theory, and the practice of forensic anthropology in the United States. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FA 800: Field Methods in Forensic Anthropology
    This course will provide students with a sound basis for archaeological methods applied to a variety of forensic settings. Students will learn core concepts from academic archaeology and how forensic archaeology differs from traditional methods. 3 cr
  • GMS FA 802: Applied Forensic Anthropology
    Students will gain extensive experience in forensic anthropological casework, to include experience in generating analytical notes and report preparation. Students will be exposed to a variety of casework situations that forensic anthropologists encounter in medical examiner offices, international realms, government laboratories and field situations. 3 cr
  • GMS FA 805: Advanced Crime Scene Investigation
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS FS 701 Crime Scene Investigation
    This hands-on and lecture-based course will provide students with methods and underlying theories related to specialized aspects of crime scene processing. Topics will include techniques and principles utilized in search and recovery of human remains. Forensic entomology, mechanisms of human decomposition, use of ground penetrating radar, soil composition, excavation, telltale disturbances in flora and the presence of animal activity will be examined. A semester-long practical exercise will include the search and recovery of mock remains and the reconstruction of events. 2 cr
  • GMS FA 806: Advanced Human Osteology
    This course builds on the topics covered in GMS FA 712 Human Osteology by exploring human osteology in greater depth and will include lectures and extensive experience with radiographical material. 4 cr
  • GMS FA 807: Taphonomy
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will provide students with an advanced basis for vertebrate taphonomy, both with specific focus upon forensic settings but also with a broader understanding of taphonomic processes covering archaeology, paleoecology, and zooarchaeology. 3 cr, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS FA 810: Mortuary Archaeology
    This course will provide students with an advanced theoretical basis for cross-cultural comparison of mortuary behavior and its archaeological interpretation. The topics will cover the history of archaeological though in this topics, processual and post-processual theoretical frameworks, the prehistory of burial, regional archaeological studies, modern Western burial practices and symbolism, gender and class difference, trophy taking, cannibalism, beliefs in undead and how they affect mortuary practices, military memorialization and warfare, ethical issues involved in the analysis of cemeteries and human remains, repatriation, and modern homicide investigation of serial killings and body movement. 3 cr, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS FA 812: Forensic Entomology
    This course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth examination of the basic principles, theories and practices of forensic entomology. Emphasis will be on the methods and techniques used by forensic entomologists in the investigation of homicides, suspicious and sudden deaths and in developing an estimate of time since death. At the completion of this course the student will have an advanced understanding of insect structure and function and a hands-on experience with identification, collection, preservation and analysis of the various insects found on deceased remains and the practice of estimating time since death using entomological evidence. Material will be presented in lecture sessions and then the techniques and practices of forensic entomology will be demonstrated and practiced on porcine remains at the Forensic Anthropology Research Facility in Holliston, MA. 3cr, Summer sem
  • GMS FA 814: Directed Studies in Forensic Entomology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Students will have the opportunity to develop a directed study in a specialized area of forensic entomology that is of particular interest. Var cr, all sem.
  • GMS FC 701: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences I: Protein Structure, Catalysis and Interaction
    The first module of the Foundations in Biomedical Science course "Protein structure, catalysis and interactions" will provide students with a quantitative understanding of protein structure, function, posttranslational modification and the turnover of proteins in the cell. In addition, students will gain facility with thermodynamics, catalysis, kinetics and binding equilibria as they apply to proteins and also to other molecules in biological systems (e.g. nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins, etc.). This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 702: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences II: Structure and Function of the Genome
    The second module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of biological processes that influence the inheritance, regulation, and utilization of genes. Genetic and genomic, molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 703: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences III: Architecture and Dynamics of the Cell
    The third module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the movement of proteins and membranes with the cell, the secretory process, the cytoskeletal framework of the cell and the resulting cell-cell interaction and communication with the matrix. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed to-wards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Science. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS FC 704: Foundations in Biomedical Sciences IV: Mechanisms of Cell Communication
    The fourth module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of cell communication. This module will begin by discussing overarching concepts before examining the specific types of molecules that initiate and transduce signals. Examples of cell signaling and subsequent cellular responses will then be considered in different contexts to provide a framework on which future learning can be applied. As the module progresses, the complexity of the systems explored will increase from individual cells to multicellular environments such as tissues, organs, and organisms. In addition, normal processes as well as the dysregulation of cell-cell communication is disease will be studied. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete progressive sequence. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 705: Translational Genetics and Genomics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Modern human genetics has evolved at a tremendous pace, with the promise of an affordable complete genome sequence for every individual just around the corner. While the raw information has increased exponentially, its translation to patient care has not kept pace. We will discuss exciting recent advances in human genetics and genomics, with illustrative examples of their translation into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of patients. We will also discuss ethical and societal challenges of this rapidly evolving field. Our course is aimed at first or second year Ph.D. students, and will be taught by faculty in a variety of departments through traditional lectures and discussion sections. Students will be evaluated on their ability to explain the translational research process and demonstrate how individual research findings build on one another to move a field forward to ultimately impact patient care.
  • GMS FC 706: Molecular Metabolism
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This optional module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. The course will present an integrated view of biochemistry and the control of cellular and organismal functions with regard to nutrient utilization. Classes include small group discussions of key papers. Mechanisms that allow cells to survive variations in nutrient supply (starvation, feeding, nutrient excess/stress) and how these mechanisms contribute to metabolic derangements contribute to disease pathogenesis (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer) will be discussed. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 707: Physiology of Specialized Cells
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is one of the elective course modules (Module V) of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum. Knowledge of cellular and molecular physiology is critical to understanding the higher order of functioning of tissues, organs, and organs systems. The objective of the course is to discuss the specialized adaptations of cells that help them to function in their respective tissues and organs. This course will also provide a framework to bridge the gap between the biochemistry and the molecular and cellular biology that students have acquired in the core modules (I through IV) and organ physiology and pharmacology that will be addressed in the second year. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS FC 708: Professional Development Skills
    This course introduces basic professional development skills for PhD students in the following areas:communication skills, research compliance/law/bioethics, and personal professional development.
  • GMS FC 762: Critical Thinking in Biomedical Research
    The primary goal of this course is to use the framework of the scientific literature to develop Critical Thinking Skills to generate novel hypotheses with a focus on establishing novel biological mechanisms and pathways. Critical Thinking skills will be used to examine research findings and theories to uncover inconsistencies, bias, or faulty logic. The student will be expected to build on their careful evaluation and analysis of the papers to create a novel hypothesis each week and design a single experiment to address their question. The weekly course discussion will be student led and this will facilitate the development of teaching skills. Generally the papers to be discussed will be an older, classic paper, which established an important new concept and a newer paper that builds on that theme. Grading is based on weekly participation in class discussions, presentations, and a concise final written assignment. 2cr, spring