Courses

  • GMS MS 981: Certified Full Time-With Courses
    0 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MS 982: Certified Full Time-With Courses
    0 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 983: Continuing Study-Part Time
    0 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MS 984: Continuing Study-Part Time
    0 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 700: Nutrition and Metabolism Seminar
    Students learn the principles of presenting an effective scientific talk, including the use of PowerPoint to create appropriate and effective slides. Each student is required to give three talks to their classmates during the semester as well as a final public research seminar talk at the end of the semester. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 709: Research Design and Statistical Methods for Biomedical Sciences
    The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of basic concepts of research design and data analysis in the biomedical sciences. The primary didactic areas to be covered include framing hypotheses and objectives, the use of experimental designs and, to a lesser degree, non-experimental designs, problems of differential and non-differential error (including bias and confounding), foundational principles of data description and analysis (independent vs. correlated, parametric and non-parametric, measures of central tendency and dispersion), effect estimation, the use and limitations of statistical testing, univariable and multivariable modeling, and microarray analysis. The course employs both didactic sessions and in-class discussion. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 755: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition I: Energy Balance and Micronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, or equivalent, and consent of instructor
    This is the first semester of a 2 semester sequence (that can be taken in either order) that focuses on the Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Bases of Nutrition. This semester will cover concepts of essential nutrients and methods for determining their requirements (DRIs), body composition, nutrition and growth, energy expenditure, regulation of energy intake, vitamins and macro-mineral metabolism (Ca, P) and micronutrients. Functions and roles of micronutrients in signaling from gene to whole organism will be discussed. Implications for nutrient requirements through the life cycle and in health and disease will be addressed. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers addressing each topic, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies - basic (cell and molecular), clinical and epidemiological. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 756: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Macronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, and consent of instructor
    Regulation of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein digestion, absorption, transport, tissue and cellular metabolism. Integration of macronutrient metabolism in response to alteration in nutritional status (e.g. starvation, obesity) on a whole body and tissue-specific basis. Mechanism regulating macronutrient metabolism in response to stresses such as exercise and aging and disease. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate research papers, provide knowledge of seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to research approaches and state of the art methods (e.g. assessment of metabolic flux using stable isotopes, euglycemic clamps, metabolomics). 4 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 757: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Regulation of Energy Balance
    This course examines mechanisms regulating body weight, body composition and food intake. Weekly discussion sessions will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies - both basic (cell and molecular) and translational perspectives. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 2cr., Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 804: Directed Studies in Medical Nutrition
    This course may be used by individual students or small groups of sstudents to carry out a directed study under the guidance of a GMS Faculty member. 4 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 901: Research in Medical Nutrition Sciences
    Var cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 902: Research in Medical Nutrition Sciences
    Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS OB 700: Biostatistics
    Introduces the concepts and techniques of biostatistics used in dental research. Emphasizes the fundamentals of statistical logic and presents the basic principles of experimental design, statistical inference, and probability. Examples from current basic sciences research, survey research, and clinical trials augment the presentation of statistical theory. 2 cr, Fall sem. Not offered in 2015.
  • GMS OB 761: Oral Microbiology
    Distribution, ecology, and pathogenic potential of oral microbiota. Pathogenicity of components of bacterial plaque and their role in the development of oral diseases. Mechanisms of local and systematic resistance to pathogenic oral microbiota. 2 cr, Spring sem. Not offered in 2015-2016.
  • GMS OB 763: Basic Processes in Oral Biology
    An introductory survey course that examines biological processes at the cellular and molecular levels. Provides a basis to understand the events that regulate inflammation; wound healing; bone formation and resorption; salivary proteins and physiology; tooth development, eruption, and movement; and fluoride action. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS OB 764: Basic Processes in Oral Biology
    An introductory survey course that examines biological processes at the cellular and molecular levels. Provides a basis to understand the events that regulate inflammation; wound healing; bone formation and resorption; salivary proteins and physiology; tooth development, eruption, and movement; and fluoride action. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS OB 766: Oral Immunology and Microbiology
    This course has two modules: oral immunology and oral microbiology. The purpose of this course is to present material relative to the subject of oral immunobiology. The course will deal with the basics of the immune reaction from a subcellular level to an entire host reaction as they pertain to the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease processes in the oral cavity. This course will relate basic science findings to the clinical situations with an emphasis on treatment modalities for delivering clinical care. It is also the purpose of the course to provide an understanding of disease pathogenesis so that an informed basis of therapy can be recommended. The course will examine the complex microbial ecology of the mouth, with focus on the key microbes involved in dental diseases. The lectures will include the basic aspects of oral biofilm formation and microbial pathogenicity, with focus on the microbial diversity involved in caries, periodontal and periapical infections. There will be a short analysis of diagnostic microbial identification, as well as treatment modalities. The overall goal of the second module will be to link microbial clinical problems with basic infectious disease concepts, for a well informed approach to treatment. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS OB 800: Advanced Oral Biology
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS OB763 and OB 764; GMS BI755 and BI 756
    This advanced course will explore in-depth current topics in oral biology research. The format of the course consists primarily of formal didactic lectures, but students will also be challenged to analyze experimental approaches and methods from current literature in a group-discussion "journal" club format in which papers from current literature are assigned and discussed. This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge and to develop critical thinking abilities. Topics will include host molecular, cellular, and genetic bases of periodontal diseases; microbiology of periodontal diseases; molecular events in inflammation, wound healing, and periodontal tissue regeneration; molecular components and function of the periodontal ligament, cementum, and attachment structures; extracellular matrix accumulation and turnover in mineralized and non-mineralized tissues; the etiology and complications of diabetes, with emphasis on oral tissue pathology and mechanisms, biosynthesis and functions of oral mucins, endocrine-dependent periodontal changes, effects of growth factors on periodontal tissues and cells, biosynthesis and structure of salivary proteins, and mechanisms of non-immune antibacterial processes in the oral cavity. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS OB 805: Oral Biology Seminar
    All PhD candidates will attend a weekly seminar series organized by the Department of Oral Biology. Faculty and invited speakers will give seminars, as will students nearing completion of their thesis research projects. Students will be encouraged to suggest invited speakers. Enrollment in this course will be required for two years (2 credits per semester, for a total of eight credits). All PhD candidates are required to attend all seminars for their entire period of study. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS OB 806: Oral Biology Seminar
    All PhD candidates will attend a weekly seminar series organized by the Department of Oral Biology. Faculty and invited speakers will give seminars, as will students nearing completion of their thesis research projects. Students will be encouraged to suggest invited speakers. Enrollment in this course will be required for two years (2 credits per semester, for a total of eight credits). All PhD candidates are required to attend all seminars for their entire period of study. 2 cr, Spring sem.