Courses

  • GMS IM 670: Special Topics in Bioimaging
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Imaging has come to increasingly serve as a substrate and necessary ingredient for progressively more complex diagnoses and therapy. The increasing significance of the imaging components has been classically appreciated in fields such as radiation therapy, where planning of treatment based on images is integral to the therapy itself, and has spread beyond the boundaries of such disciplines to numerous surgical fields such as neurosurgery, orthopedics, and ear, nose, and throat surgery. This course provides focused work in such areas as PET/CT and ultrasound/EEG/MEG. 2 cr,
  • GMS IM 680: Professional Development
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course provides instruction in application softwares for imaging processing and mathematical analysis. In addition, this is a preparatory course for students making the transition from a formal academic program into the dynamic work place. It will cover those fundamental skills required to facilitate searching, locating and qualifying for the job of one's choice. It will cover topics such as building a portfolio, networking, resume writing, and interviewing skills. Speakers in the various fields of imaging will be invited to discuss how he or she make the transition into the workplace and students will have the opportunity to discuss and discover the various pitfalls on the paths of entry into the field of his or her choice. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 690: Imaging of Neurological Disorders of the Brain
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will look at the role played by modern, minimally invasive imaging techniques in the detection, management, research and testing of treatment efficacy of various neurological diseases that affect the brain. Each week a different disorder will be presented. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 700: Thesis Research I
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    First phase of the directed research project, either thesis or practicum, in the field of bioimaging. Students choose an area of concentration in bioimaging and identify a line of research with clearly defined specific objectives to be conducted. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 701: Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Imaging techniques such as computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have seen rapid rates of growth in the past years. It is vital that professionals working with these imaging tools have a strong working knowledge of gross anatomy to understand the images they are looking at. This course is designed to give students in the Masters in Bioimaging program the fundamental knowledge they will need of gross anatomy. The course is taught from medical images such as CT and MRI rather than more traditional methods since this is the source of information the MBI students are expected to encounter in their future. 2 cr,
  • GMS IM 705: Clinical and MR Pathophysiology
    This course familiarizes the student with common pathologies found in magnetic resonance imaging and the appearance of these pathologies in various imaging protocols and the imaging appearance of a variety of pathological aberrations affecting patients. The knowledge of disease processes and their signal characteristics on various imaging sequences is essential to ensure the best practices in patient care and quality imaging. This course will include a high level review of clinical imaging in various disease states. Lectures are geared toward a practical, problem-solving approach to conditions and a systematic approach to interpretation of diagnostic imaging studies will be utilized. 4 cr
  • GMS IM 710: Thesis Research II
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Second phase of a four-semester thesis research project in the field of bioimaging during which students postulate a hypothesis, design an experimental protocol to test the hypothesis, acquire data (pilot and final). 2 cr
  • GMS IM 730: Thesis Research III
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Third phase of a four-semester thesis project in the field of bioimaging during which students finish data analysis and primarily concentrate on writing a comprehensive technical report describing in detail their work in Phases I and II. 2 cr
  • GMS IM 791: Clinical Internship I
    This course is the first of two structured clinical internship courses designed to provide students with clinical practice and patient management training. Student progression in competency levels through clinical performance objectives are accomplished through demonstration and observation, after which the student assists in performing specified clinical activities. When a satisfactory degree of proficiency is apparent, the student performs specific activities under supervision to achieve clinical competency specified under Article II of the American Registry Radiological Technologists (ARRT) Rules and Regulations. 4 cr
  • GMS IM 792: Clinical Internship II
    Graduate Prerequisites: GMS IM 791
    This course is the second of two structural clinical internship courses designed to provide students with clinical practice and patient management training. Student progression in competency levels through clinical performance objectives are accomplished through demonstration and observation, after which the student assists in performing specified clinical activities. When a satisfactory degree of proficiency is apparent, the student performs specific activities under supervision to achieve clinical competency specified under Article II of the American Registry Radiological Technologists (ARRT) Rules and Regulations. 4 cr
  • GMS MA 605: History of Medicine and Healing in the United States
    This course explores the history of medical and therapeutic pluralism in the United States, beginning with the colonial period and continuing to the present. We will examine how this pluralism necessarily includes the story of American religious pluralism, the rise of biomedicine, and the changing faces of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), while factoring in the roles of class, race, and gender. We will work with primary source materials, as well as sources from history of medicine, and medical anthropology. 4 cr, Spring sem. M 3:30-6:15, Charles River Campus.
  • GMS MA 610: Reading Ethnography in Medical Anthropology
    [Not currently offered] This seminar will read medical anthropological ethnographies analytically. Starting with a review of the debates, going through selected classic ethnographic studies, the seminar will explore ethnographies that address different cultural meanings of human experiences of suffering and affliction, including illness and violence. Students will engage in studying the methodology, theoretical underpinnings, writing, and social positions represented in these ethnographies. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MA 620: World Religions and Healing
    An introduction to approaches to healing integral to Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, African, African-descended, Latin American, Chinese, Native American traditions, and to some of the outcomes of their interactions, in relation to the experience of affliction and suffering. Draws on source materials from history, religious studies, and medical anthropology. 4 cr, Fall sem. M 2:30-5:15, Charles River Campus.
  • GMS MA 621: Theory and Methods in Religion and Healing
    This course is an examination of the aim, function, justification and critique of classical and contemporary "theories" of religious traditions (social-scientific, psychological, phenomenological, theological, historical) using, as an organizing focus, the cross-cultural study of healing traditions. Laird. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MA 622: Religion, Culture and Public Health
    This medical anthropology course will explore relationships between religion, culture, and health in the context of public health projects. We will examine historical developments, examples of faith-based public health organizations, and current research on "religious health assets," both locally and internationally. Students will design and conduct qualitative research projects on the culture of a faith-based health organization. 3 cr, Fall sem Th 3:30-6:15, Charles River Campus.
  • GMS MA 624: Anthropology of Immigrant Health
    This medical anthropology course presents different ways of studying cultural and medical pluralism in the United States through ethnographies. We will analyze changes of ethnicity, gender, race, national identity and health practices that have marked both historical and contemporary migrations of people to the United States. We will also explore the impact of intensified transnationalism, health status changes and healthcare practices among newer American groups, as they also maintain ties to homelands and seek ways to form healthy communities in the United States. How do these communities encounter and challenge factors that contribute to health disparities? In particular, we will examine the roles of religious life and practice in relation to a range of healing ways in immigrant communities.
  • GMS MA 626: Native Health, Healing and Medicine, and Contemporary Practices
    This course examines Native American and Alaskan Native health conditions and associated systems of healing. Students will investigate historical and contemporary Native perspectives of illness, disease, and wellness. Emphasis will be placed on the sociocultural impact of national and local health policies upon Native physical, social, emotional, and spiritual bodies. A major facet of the class will be the design and implementation of a research partnership with a local tribal health organization in order to conduct an applied medical anthropology project. Readings will draw on medical anthropology ethnographic, Public Health, epidemiologic, biomedical, nursing, and Native studies. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MA 630: Medical Anthropology and the Cultures of Biomedicine
    This course examines biomedicine as a cultural system with multiple local and national expressions worldwide, all of which have undergone changes over time. Topics will include the exploration of biomedicine as a cultural system, with cultural variations and different conceptual domains; processes of acculturation to biomedicine, the medicalization of social realities; biomedical narratives; the patient-doctor relationship (including when the physician is the patient); understandings of interventions and the meanings assigned to them; and different ways of thinking about efficacy in relation to process and chronicity. The course will draw on ethnographic studies of biomedicine not only in the United States, but in other global settings. 3 cr, Spring sem. M 2:30-5:15, Charles River Campus.
  • GMS MA 640: The Cultural Formation of the Clinician: Its Implications for Practice
    This course provides a context for exploring and reflecting on one's own cultural formation, in relation to aspects of one's identity like gender, sexual orientation, social class, race, immigration, religion, age, mental health and addiction, and disabilities. Unearned social privilege, and related blind spots toward these parts of our identities, have been shown to increase risks for related health disparities and problematic research findings. The course examines how our unconscious biases can enter our work as care providers or researchers. Offered through M.S. program in Medical Anthropology. 3 cr, Fall sem. W 5:00-7:50, Medical Campus.
  • GMS MA 650: Society, Healthcare, and the Cultures of Competence
    This course examines the history and current policies of health education, beginning with the notion of "competencies" as a basis for biomedical training and the development of a model of professional enculturation that has been exported to other fields. This medical anthropology course focuses on the conceptual and embodied formation of key "professional competencies" in medicine, acupuncture, and chaplaincy; and explores the contested meanings of "cultural competence." Readings include autobiographical and ethnographic accounts of medical students, physicians, chaplains, and acupuncturists. Students conduct qualitative interviews with health professionals and students and learn to evaluate curricula for training competent professionals. 3 cr, Spring sem. Th 3:30-6:15, Charles River Campus.