Courses

  • GMS MS 572: Directed Studies in Medical Sciences
    Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 640: Introduction to Biomedical Information
    (Required course for M.S. in Medical Sciences students). This course teaches how to find, use, and contribute to biomedical literature while supporting the graduate thesis through lectures and hands-on instruction. Topics include the retrieval, evaluation and management of information, Evidence Based Medicine, and the ethical use of research. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 700: Elementary Biostatistics for the Biomedical Sciences
    Topics include collection, classification, and presentation of descriptive data; the rationale of hypothesis testing; experimental design; t-tests; simple correlation analysis; and analysis of contingency tables. Special attention is directed to the ability to recognize and interpret statistical procedures in articles from current literature. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 783: Molecular Basis of Neurologic Diseases
    Molecular mechanisms of stroke, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotropic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, and neoplasia are considered. Fundamentals and current research in molecular biology are reviewed. Current publication seminar discussions are held with student participation. Distinguished guest speakers give keynote lectures monthly. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MS 791: Essential Readings in Translational Research
    The goal of this course is to provide students with tools, skills and experience in critically reading and evaluating current advances in basic and clinical sciences published in the literature which are pertinent to understanding the basis of disease mechanisms and treatment. Acquisition of knowledge and skills in critical analysis, statistical inference and experimental design will provide students with the ability to read the medical and scientific literature and to examine it critically to achieve life-long learning. The course format will be based on presentation of chosen topics. It will consist of evaluation of assigned readings of recently published articles in basic and clinical sciences which are relevant to diseases. This format will provide students an opportunity to learn how to critically read and evaluate basic and clinical literature and to present their critical analysis for discussion by peers. This is an important skill needed for their future endeavors in medical research and clinical settings. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 793: Fundamentals of Medical Biotechnology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The course will provide students with an historical perspective of the fast emerging medical biotechnology field and the innovative processes that ensure the success of such endeavors. The course will cover a host of topics that will provide students with a springboard to develop their creative thinking and explore a new vision of medical biotechnology. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 971: Rel MED Sci
    Var cr
  • GMS MS 972: Rel MED Sci
    Var cr
  • GMS MS 981: Certified Full Time-With Courses
    0 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MS 982: Certified Full Time-With Courses
    0 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MS 983: Continuing Study-Part Time
    0 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MS 984: Continuing Study-Part Time
    0 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 620: Clinical Nutrition Research
    Graduate Prerequisites: Human Physiology or equivalent, consent of instructor
    The course focuses on the impact of nutrition and related exposures on various diseases and conditions. Students will become acquainted with current concepts and methods in human nutrition research, including issues in the design and conduct of clinical and translational studies of nutrition-related exposures and outcomes. The class will familiarize students with important topics in the field, including those related to major health outcomes such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, bone health, gastrointestinal disorders, and cancer. 3 cr, Fall or Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 700: Nutrition and Metabolism Seminar
    Students learn the principles of presenting an effective scientific talk, including the use of PowerPoint to create appropriate and effective slides. In consultation with course faculty, each student selects a topic and two related key papers and then develops a presentation over the course of the semester within the class. Using feedback provided after each practice talk, students present their final public research seminar talk at the end of the semester. The course also expands knowledge of topics in nutrition and metabolism. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 709: Research Design and Statistical Methods for Biomedical Sciences
    The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of basic concepts of research design and data analysis in the biomedical sciences. The primary didactic areas to be covered include framing hypotheses and objectives, the use of experimental designs and, to a lesser degree, non-experimental designs, problems of differential and non- differential error (including bias and confounding), foundational principles of data description and analysis (independent vs. correlated data, parametric and non-parametric distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion), effect estimation, the use and limitations of statistical testing, including univariable and multivariable modeling, and microarray analysis. The course employs both didactic sessions and in-class exercises. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 755: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition I: Energy Balance and Micronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, or equivalent, and consent of instructor
    This is the first semester of a 2 semester sequence (that can be taken in either order) that focuses on the Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Bases of Nutrition. This semester will cover concepts of essential nutrients and methods for determining their requirements (DRIs), body composition, nutrition and growth, energy expenditure, regulation of energy intake, vitamins and macro-mineral metabolism (Ca, P) and micronutrients. Functions and roles of micronutrients in signaling from gene to whole organism will be discussed. Implications for nutrient requirements through the life cycle and in health and disease will be addressed. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers addressing each topic, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies - basic (cell and molecular), clinical and epidemiological. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 756: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Macronutrients
    Graduate Prerequisites: at least one semester each of Biochemistry and Physiology, and consent of instructor
    Regulation of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein digestion, absorption, transport, tissue and cellular metabolism. Integration of macronutrient metabolism in response to alteration in nutritional status (e.g. starvation, obesity) on a whole body and tissue-specific basis. Mechanisms regulating macronutrient metabolism in response to stresses such as exercise, aging, and disease. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate research papers, provide knowledge of seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to research approaches and state of the art methods (e.g. assessment of metabolic flux using stable isotopes, euglycemic clamps, metabolomics). 4 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 757: Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Regulation of Energy Balance
    This course examines mechanisms regulating body weight, body composition and food intake. Weekly discussion sessions will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies, including both basic (cell and molecular) and translational perspectives. Weekly writing assignments on the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. 2cr., Fall sem.
  • GMS NU 804: Directed Studies in Nutrition and Metabolism
    This course may be used by individual students or small groups of students to carry out a directed study under the guidance of a GMS Faculty member. Var credit, Fall or Spring sem.
  • GMS NU 901: Research in Nutrition and Metabolism
    These research credits reflect the fall semester periods of study when students are in the laboratory or other research unit carrying out research for their master's thesis or doctoral dissertation. Var cr, Fall sem.