Courses

  • GMS MH 717: Theory and Practice of Child and Adolescent Counseling
    This course presents evidence-based clinical mental health counseling practices designed to impact children and adolescents. The course will focus on theoretical underpinnings and options for intervening directly with the child/adolescent, with parents/guardians, and in schools or other environmental settings. Sensitivity to multicultural perspectives and competencies will also be reviewed. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MH 718: Psychological Trauma Across the Lifespan
    This course will provide students with a foundation in psychological trauma and its impact on mental and physical health. Two frameworks -- biopsychosocial and developmental psychopathology -- will be used for students to gain up-to-date knowledge on the consequences of traumatic experiences and other serious adversities along the molar (behavior) to molecular (neurobiology) continuum and across the lifespan. With an emphasis on evidence-based practice, students will attain core clinical competencies in the assessment and treatment of trauma-related symptoms and problems through various didactic and experiential activities. Evaluation strategies will encompass the utility of diagnostic nosologies (i.e., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM]) as well as case conceptualization. State-of-the-science interventions will be covered so that students acquire knowledge and skills in helping traumatized individuals to successfully ameliorate their symptoms and improve their functioning.
  • GMS MH 810: Psychopharmacology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course provides an overview of psychopharmacology for the non-medical clinical mental health counseling provider. There will be an overview of the neurobiology of mental health disorders and the medications commonly used in their treatment. 3 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MH 812: Addictions
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The aim of this course is to provide the necessary knowledge base for understanding and treating addiction. This course places emphasis on acquiring clinically useful knowledge and skills for recognizing and treating substance use disorders. Topics covered in this course include: recognizing drug intoxication and withdrawal, assessment of substance use disorders, Community Reinforcement Approach, Family Systems Treatment Models, Motivational, Enhancement Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral/Skills Building approaches, 12-Step Recovery/Mutual Support Groups, and Addiction Medicine. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MH 814: Clinical Research Field Work Seminar
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and experience in the conduct of clinical trials. Students enrolled in this practicum will become part of a clinical research team investigating the efficacy of clinical and/or medication management of a discrete mental health and/or medical disorder. Topics of study are dependent on site of interest from a list of sites currently conducting trials and availability of staff to supervise students. Training will include readings, presentations, observation, web-based training, and direct experience working with research participants. Var cr, Fall & Spring sem.
  • GMS MH 901: Orientation to Professional Counseling
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course provides an orientation to the clinical mental health counseling profession, including the history and foundations of clinical mental health counseling, developing a professional identity, review of the settings and systems where clinical mental health counselors provide services, emergency preparedness, models of clinical supervision, professional organizations and licensure, clinical mental health counselor advocacy, preparations for practicum and internship training, and self-care strategies. This course will also provide an overview of the clinical training component of the MHCBM program. 3 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MH 902: Practicum Supervision
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    The practicum is a distinctly-defined and supervised clinical mental health counseling experience that provides direct mental health service work. Students are placed in a wide variety of clinical settings throughout the greater Boston area. Students engage in 240 hours of clinical training over the course of an academic semester where they provide clinical mental health counseling services to a diverse range of clients. In addition to clinical supervision received on site, students meet for weekly group supervision with a faculty member and other student trainees in the MHCBM Program. As part of this, students conduct brief psychosocial bedside interviews at Boston Medical Center, under the supervision of the course instructor. 3 cr, Spring and Summer sem.
  • GMS MH 921: Internship Supervision
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is a distinctly defined clinical experience during the 2nd year of the program. Students provide 600 hours of clinical experience, of which 250 are direct clinical care of clients. Students are placed in a wide variety of clinical settings throughout the greater Boston area. In addition to clinical supervision received on site, students meet for group supervision with a faculty member and other student trainees in the MHCBM program. 6 cr each, Fall and Spring sem
  • GMS MH 922: Internship Supervision
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course is a distinctly defined clinical experience during the 2nd year of the program. Students provide 600 hours of clinical experience, of which 250 are direct clinical care of clients. Students are placed in a wide variety of clinical settings throughout the greater Boston area. In addition to clinical supervision received on site, students meet for group supervision with a faculty member and other student trainees in the MHCBM program. Students also present a Capstone Case Presentation. 6 cr each, Fall and Spring sem
  • GMS MI 701: Concepts in Virology
    The goals of this course are to provide a fundamental understanding of virus molecular biology. The course will build on prior understanding of mammalian cellular and molecular biology and will follow the replication cycle of animal viruses, focusing in detail on the molecular mechanisms that they utilize to enter cells and generate their progeny. The course will examine key concepts in molecular virology, including virus structure, how viruses can attach and enter cells, express and replicate their genomes, take advantage of the host cell translation machinery, and package and release virus progeny. There will also be lectures on key events in the history of virology, antivirals and how viruses can be manipulated and used as tools. The course will be aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences and taught by Microbiology Department faculty with expertise in virology. The content will include a combination of powerpoint presentations and discussion of primary research papers. Reading materials will include primary literature and suggested review articles. Students will be evaluated on their discussion of papers, written work, a presentation and a final examination designed to test the students' critical thinking and analytical skills. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MI 713: Comprehensive Immunology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Comprehensive introduction to immunologic principles and applications. This course consists of both interactive lectures and discussion sessions. Emphasis is placed on analysis and interpretation of data from the primary literature. Prior coursework in genetics and biochemistry is strongly recommended. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MI 715: Immunological Basis of Disease
    Journal article-based survey of mechanisms underlying diseases caused by abnormal immune system function. Emphasis will be on normal vs. pathological immune system processes towards reinforcing how basic immunological concepts have immediate clinical significance. Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MI 718: Virology
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Journal article based. Survey of current topics in virology are discussed. An emphasis is placed on the regulation of viral gene transcription and other processes of the viral replicative cycle. 4 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MI 811: Microbiology Seminar
    Presentation and discussion of problems of current interest. 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MI 812: Microbiology Seminar
    Presentation and discussion of problems of current interest. 2 cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MI 823: Special Topics in Microbiology
    Var cr, Spring sem.
  • GMS MI 911: Research Microbiology
    Var cr
  • GMS MI 912: Research Microbiology
    Var cr
  • GMS MM 701: Genetics and Epidemiology of Disease
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    Topics include: Human Genome Structure and Function; Population Genetics; Genetic Risk Assessment; Non-Mendelian Inheritance; Approaches for Studying the Genetics of Complex Traits; Chromosomes and Chromosome Abnormalities; Principles of Cancer Genetics and Genetic Diagnostics; Methods of Human Linkage Analysis; Identifying Human Disease Genes; Genotype-Phenotype Correlations; and Applications of the "New Genetics". 2 cr, Fall sem.
  • GMS MM 703: Cancer Biology and Genetics
    Graduate Prerequisites: consent of instructor
    This course will cover topics in human tumor biology including: Tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis; Viruses, immunodeficiency, and cancer; Chemical carcinogenesis; Signal transduction; Anti-oncogenes and familial cancer syndromes; Apoptosis and cancer; Cell cycle control; DNA repair; Principles of Cancer Therapy; Immunotherapy of Cancer; Anti-angiogenesis therapy; and modern molecular diagnostic techniques. 2 cr, Fall sem.