Engineering Core

  • ENG EK 546: Assessment of Sustainable Energy Technologies
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS PY 105 or CAS CH 101 or CAS ES 105; or equivalent, CAS MA 121 or equivalent; graduate or junior/senior standing
    Critical to launching new energy ventures and implementing new energy policies is developing a broad understanding of how technically feasible the proposed project/technology in meeting the economic, environmental, and end-use requirements. This course will provide students with the background needed to assess the potential for energy efficiency and effectiveness of different technologies, the related economics, as well as identify the key technical risks in emerging technologies. Examples will be drawn from a variety of emerging technologies such as solar photovoltaics, fuel cells, advanced transportation technology, as well as conservation options such as motors, cogeneration, building automation and HVAC. This course will also address evaluating the life cycle implications of emerging technologies, including manufacturing issues, end-of-life, as well as estimating performance. 4cr. 2nd sem.
  • ENG EK 697: Graduate Part-time Engineering Practice
    Graduate Prerequisites: MS and MEng students approved for the Engineering Practice degree option.
    Students register upon receiving an internship position. The Engineering Practice degree option helps students to integrate classroom theory with actual engineering experience. Under professional supervision, students acquire firsthand knowledge about the engineering environment by working in a paid, part-time position, while registering for 4-11 credits.
  • ENG EK 698: Graduate Engineering Practice
    Graduate Prerequisites: MS and MEng students approved for the Engineering Practice degree option.
    Students register upon receiving an internship position. The Engineering Practice degree option helps students to integrate classroom theory with actual engineering experience. Under professional supervision, students acquire firsthand knowledge about the engineering environment by working in a paid, full-time position.
  • ENG EK 720: Biophotonic System Design and Prototyping
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
    Theory and practice of biophotonic instrument design with application to biomedical devices. Students will work on problems introduced and defined by physicians and clinical researchers, to develop new medical products from concept to prototype design and development. Students in physics, chemistry, and engineering will learn fundamentals of biophotonics sensors and systems development and prototyping for three end uses: in vivo platforms, exploring innovative techniques for sub-cellular imaging of biomolecular structure and interactions in living tissue; resonant and interferometric biosensors, exploring resonance-enhanced photonic pathogen detection or disease diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity; and point-of-care diagnosis, exploring rapid, low-cost spectroscopic and imaging techniques that will add to our understanding biological behavior at the molecular level and will lead to important new tools for biomedicine, particularly in areas where there are currently few means of diagnosis. The course provides foundational instruction with respect to core photonic and biomedical design principles, and a case-study based instructional approach to technology transfer and prototyping. Semester-long projects conducted by interdisciplinary teams involve design and prototyping based on problems introduced by practitioners and researchers identified by a regional health care consortium, CIMIT. 4 cr.
  • ENG EK 731: Bench-to-Bedside: Translating Biomedical Innovation from the Laboratory to the Marketplace
    The subject of the course is the translation of medical technologies into new products and services for the healthcare system. The course begins with a rigorous study of intellectual property, licensing and the core aspects of planning, creating, funding and building new entrepreneurial ventures. Concepts and tools are presented for assessing new technologies and their potential to be the basis for a new entrepreneurial venture. Comparisons will be made of how technologies can be sourced and commercialized out of three very different environments: universities, national laboratories and corporate laboratories. Cross-disciplinary teams of students will be formed which will evaluate translational research projects currently being developed at Boston University and their potential for transformation into a start-up company to commercialize the technology, providing a unique linkage between the scientific research activities of the university and the professional schools. Each week there will be a case study which will discuss examples of both success and failure in technology commercialization. Some of these case studies examine Boston University life sciences spin-out companies, and the founders and CEO?s of these ventures will share their experiences with the class.
  • ENG EK 920: Summer Research Experience
    By department approval only. Research carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.