Courses

  • CGS RH 103: Rhetorical Practices from the Ancient World to Enlightenment
    In Rhetoric 103, you will be taken chronologically through key periods in history to learn about the origin and development of the art of Rhetoric and its relevance today, ultimately in order to enable you to apply key rhetorical skills to your own textual and verbal practice. Students will receive semester-long instruction and practice in writing, oral communication, and research and information literacy. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Writing, Research, and Inquiry, Oral and/or Signed Communication, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Writing, Research, and Inquiry
    • Oral and/or Signed Communication
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • CGS RH 104: Rhetorical Practices from The Industrial Revolution through the Digital Revolution
    Through class discussion and learning experiences, students explore connections between readings assigned in Rhetoric and those in other courses, focusing on themes drawn from the two units that comprise the semester's curriculum. The course further develops skills in expository writing and introduces exploratory essay writing. Students continue to explore the contemporary relevance and meaning of the interdisciplinary curriculum. Students refine their skills in grammar, style, organization, and document design. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): First-Year Writing Seminar, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Critical Thinking.
    • First-Year Writing Seminar
    • Digital/Multimedia Expression
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS SS 101: How Societies Work: An Introduction to the Social Sciences
    CGS SS 101 -- How Societies Work: An Introduction to the Social Sciences This course introduces students to the methods of inquiry and principal concepts of the social sciences--a handful of disciplines that includes anthropology, sociology, social psychology, economics, political science, and history. Through the analysis of contemporary society and cross-cultural studies, students will examine the importance of culture, the economy, and power and authority, and learn how these structures interconnect with each other to give rise to distinctive patterns of human thought and behavior. Consideration is given to the categories of race, class, and gender, both as markers of identity and bases for systems of social inequality. The course emphasizes the classical sociological theories of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber and instructs students on how to use these theories to critically evaluate social structures and historical change. One lecture, two discussions, and one additional contact hour as assigned. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • The Individual in Community
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS SS 102: Modernization: Politics, Economics, and Culture
    CGS SS 102 -- Modernization: Politics, Economics, and Culture This course examines the process of modernization in the West. The historical phenomena of industrialization, the rise of liberal democracy, nationalism, imperialism, and globalization -- all associated with modernization as it took place in Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries -- are examined both in their historical context and through the lens of theories of social change. Through an examination of historical case studies, students will evaluate the impact of these phenomena on the life, institutions, and ways of thinking in the West. Students will also consider the historical legacy of the West's modernization for contemporary global issues such as terrorism and the challenges of development in non-Western societies. One lecture, two discussions, and one additional contact hour as assigned. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry II, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS SS 103: Politics, Economies, and Social Change in the West: The Ancient World Through the Enlightenment
    This interdisciplinary course examines social change in the politics, economies, social structures, and culture of the West from the ancient world through the Enlightenment. Students look at developments in governance, trade, social inequalities, and ideas that gave the West its distinctive character, including the rise of its key institution, democracy. To interpret historical change critically, students are introduced to the social science "toolkit" of analytical concepts. Assignments outside the classroom will encourage students to consider how history has shaped today's world. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry I, Individual in Community, Critical Thinking.
    • Social Inquiry I
    • The Individual in Community
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS SS 104: Politics, Economies, and Social Change in the West: The Industrial Revolution to the Digital Revolution
    This interdisciplinary course examines social change in the politics, economies, social structures, and culture of the West from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Students consider the impact of technological innovation, industrial capitalism, global war, genocide, and the ideologies that shaped these developments. The course concludes with the globalization of economies and social structures in an era of rising inequality. Visits to relevant sites in Britain will supplement classroom instruction. One lecture, two discussions, and two additional contact hours as assigned. [5 cr.] This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Social Inquiry II, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking.
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Social Inquiry II
    • Critical Thinking
  • CGS SS 201: Social Change and Modernization in the Non-Western World: Russia and China.
    SS201 centers on case studies of modernization that began during the second half of the 19th century and continue today: those of Russia and China. Russia is considered an example of a society that underwent rapid social change in part as a result of the challenges posed by the industrialized countries of the West. It serves as a basis for comparison with the process of modernization undertaken by China at approximately the same time. Students examine the dramatic complexities of social, political, and economic changes that enhance their grasp of the problems facing the contemporary world. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Research and Information Literacy
  • CGS SS 202: America's Response to Aggression and Revolution: U.S. Foreign Policy Since the 1930s
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).
    SS202 focuses on U.S. foreign policy since the late 1930's. After considering U.S. policy immediately before and during World War II, it explores how the United States responded to the global challenge posed by the Soviet Union and international communism during the long struggle known as the Cold War. The factors that led to the Cold War, the nuclear arms race, America's involvement in Vietnam, and, ultimately, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War are examined. The course concludes by analyzing challenges to American interests and security in the twenty- first century. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Writing-intensive Course, Research and Information Literacy.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Research and Information Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • CGS SS 300: Science and Political Engagement in the 20th Century
    This course will survey the careers of individuals whose scientific research and personal convictions compelled them to defy powerful authorities. It will explore the political, moral, and social, implications of scientific discoveries in the 20th century and beyond. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Social Inquiry I
    • Critical Thinking