BA in Environmental Analysis & Policy

Environmental Analysis & Policy majors are trained broadly in the social sciences with a clearly defined specialization in the environmental field. Students learn about the social and institutional framework in which environmental and natural resource planning, management, and policy making take place. Students take classes in the natural and physical sciences to ensure they understand the biophysical basis of environmental issues. Students gain a strong set of analytical tools that are needed by a growing number of government agencies, consulting firms, and nonprofit sectors that all deal with a wide range of environmental analysis or energy and environmental policymaking.

Requirements

A major in Environmental Analysis & Policy requires the completion of 16 courses, approved by the student’s advisor, with a grade of C or higher. The 16 courses comprise seven required principal courses, four required related courses, and five elective courses. Up to one semester (4 credits) of Directed Study (ES/ GE 491 or 492) or Honors Research (ES/GE 401 or 402) may be applied toward fulfillment of the 16-course requirement for the major.

Unless otherwise noted, all required courses are 4 credit hours.

Principal Courses (seven total)

  • CAS EC 101 Introductory Microeconomic Analysis
  • CAS GE 100 Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • CAS ES 107 Introduction to Climate and Earth System Science
  • CAS GE 309 Intermediate Environmental Analysis and Policy
  • CAS GE 375 Introduction to Quantitative Environmental Modeling
  • CAS GE 420 Methods of Environmental Policy Analysis
  • CAS GE 425 United States Environmental Policy or CAS GE/IR 304 Environmentally Sustainable Development

Required Related Courses (four total)

  • CAS BI 107 Biology I
  • CAS BI 306 Biology of Global Change or CAS GE 307 Biogeography
  • CAS MA 121 or CAS MA 123
  • CAS GE 270 Data, Models, and Analysis in Earth & Environment (or CAS MA 213 or CAS EC 203, with permission of the student’s academic advisor)

Electives (five total)

Five courses from the following list. The topical areas are meant to be suggestive only. Students may, with their advisor’s approval, substitute equivalent courses through the Washington, D.C., Internship Program and the Venice Environmental Studies Program. Additionally, students may apply up to two courses from the Ecuador Tropical Ecology Program toward fulfillment of elective credit in the major.

Environmental Modeling

  • CAS GE 302 Remote Sensing of the Environment
  • CAS EE 348E Monitoring and Management of Coastal Wetlands, Lagoons, and Estuaries (taught in Venice, Italy)
  • CAS EE 349E Global Climate Change: Science, Economics, and Policy (taught in Venice, Italy)
  • CAS GE 365 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • CAS GE 440 Digital Image Processing—Remote Sensing
  • CAS GE 445 Physical Models in Remote Sensing
  • CAS GE 501 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing
  • CAS GE 502 Field Measurements in Remote Sensing
  • CAS GE 505 Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
  • CAS GE 512 Global Climate Change: Policy Modeling and Analysis
  • CAS GE 516 Multivariate Analysis for Geographers
  • CAS GE 519 Energy, Society, and the Environment
  • CAS GE 550 Modeling Environmental and Social Systems

Economic and Policy Analysis

  • CAS EC 201 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
  • CAS EC 320 Economics of Less-Developed Regions
  • CAS EC 371 Environmental Economics
  • CAS EC 337 Economic Analysis of Legal Issues
  • CAS EC 571 Energy and Environmental Economics
  • CAS GE 250 The Fate of Nations: Climate, Resources, and Institutions
  • CAS GE/IR 304 Environmentally Sustainable Development
  • CAS GE 460 Resource Economics and Policy
  • CAS GE 519 Energy, Society, and the Environment
  • CAS HI 292 Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US
  • CAS HI 589 Nature’s Past: Histories of Environment and Society
  • CAS IR 552/PO 544 Nordic Europe
  • CAS IR 592 Economic Development and International Institutions
  • CAS PO 522 American Politics and Social Policy
  • CAS SO 313 Economic Sociology
  • CAS SO 448 Culture, Markets, and Inequality

Human Institutions

  • CAS AN 368E Australian Culture and Society (taught in Sydney, Australia)
  • CAS EC 320 Economics of Less-Developed Regions
  • CAS GE 201 Global Environmental Negotiation and Policy
  • CAS GE 250 The Fate of Nations: Climate, Resources, and Institutions
  • CAS GE/IR 304 Environmentally Sustainable Development
  • CAS GE 400 Environment and Development: A Political Ecology Approach
  • CAS GE 520 Topics in Energy and Environmental Policy
  • CAS GE 521 Environmental Law and Policy
  • CAS GE 533 Risk and Hazards
  • CAS HI 281E/IR 356E/PO 201E American Governance: Foreign Affairs (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS HI 291 Politics of the American Environment
  • CAS HI 351/GE 394 Environmental History of Africa
  • CAS HI 394 US-Mexican Borders
  • CAS HI 525 Development in Historical Perspective
  • CAS IR 391E/PO 246E Democratization: Its History and Future Challenges (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS IR/GE 594 Global Environmental Negotiation and Policy
  • CAS PO 202E Introduction to Congressional Policy Making (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS PO 203E/COM CM 556E: Strategies for Issue Development and Policy Change (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS SO 277 Technology and Society
  • CAS SO 448 Culture, Markets, and Inequality
  • COM CM 305E: Public Relations Inside the Beltway (taught in Washington, D.C.)

International Environmental Policy

  • CAS EC 320 Economics of Less-Developed Regions
  • CAS GE 201 Global Environmental Negotiation and Policy
  • CAS GE 250 The Fate of Nations: Climate, Resources, and Institutions
  • CAS GE/IR 304 Environmentally Sustainable Development
  • CAS GE 521 Environmental Law and Policy
  • HI 281E/IR 356E/PO 201E American Governance: Foreign Affairs (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS HI 351/GE 394 Environmental History of Africa
  • CAS IR 310 The Sea and International Relations
  • CAS IR 333 Non-State Actors in International Relations
  • CAS IR 373 Global Governance and International Organization
  • CAS IR 390/PO 329 International Political Economy
  • CAS IR 391E/PO 246E Democratization: Its History and Future Challenges (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS IR 395/PO 328 North-South Relations
  • CAS IR 520/PO 550 The State and Public Purpose in Asia
  • CAS IR 573 Introduction to Public International Law
  • CAS IR/GE 594 Global Environmental Negotiation and Policy
  • CAS IR 596/PO 529 Globalization and Contemporary Capitalism in Advanced Industrialized Nations
  • CAS IR/GE 597 Development and Environment in Latin America
  • CAS IR/GE 599 Science, Politics, and Climate Change
  • CAS PO 202E Introduction to Congressional Policy Making (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS PO 203E/COM CM 556E: Strategies for Issue Development and Policy Change (taught in Washington, D.C.)
  • CAS PO 281 Natural Resource Politics in the Andes (taught in Peru)
  • CAS PO 331 The Policy Making Process
  • CAS PO 381/HI 287 History of American Foreign Relations Since 1898
  • CAS SO/IR 242 Globalization and World Poverty
  • CAS SO 320 Political Sociology
  • CAS SO 440 Seminar: Political Sociology
  • COM CM 305E: Public Relations Inside the Beltway (taught in Washington, D.C.)

Additionally, any two of the following courses may be applied as electives:

Ecuador Tropical Ecology Program

  • CAS BI/EE 438E Tropical Montane Ecology
  • CAS BI/EE 439E Tropical Rainforest Ecology
  • CAS BI/EE 440E Tropical Coastal Ecology
  • CAS BI/EE 441E Studies in Tropical Ecology

Honors in the Major

Students who maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 are eligible to work toward honors in the major. Requirements include completion of the two-course sequence of independent study (CAS ES/GE 401 and ES/GE 402) and successful defense of a senior thesis as the primary means to graduate with honors in Earth & Environment. In appropriate circumstances, and with the approval of the Departmental Honors Committee, students may apply significant summer research toward the production of a senior thesis. In such cases, students combine independent summer fieldwork with either ES/GE 401 or ES/GE 402 as the basis for writing and defending a senior honors thesis.

Each honors student is advised by at least two faculty members, who act as first and second readers of the Senior Honors Thesis. Interested students should contact the department Director of Undergraduate Studies, who oversees departmental honors, no later than March of the junior year.