Political Science

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  • CAS PO 341: European Politics
    Meets with CAS IR 362. Comparative study of politics in member states of the European Union, with emphasis on political development, institutions, major issues in contemporary politics, and the impact of European integration. Selective references to original and new member states of the EU. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 361.
  • CAS PO 343: Europe and International Relations
    Meets with CAS IR 250. Provides an overview European affairs. Topics include the foreign policies of European nations, the dynamics of European integration, NATO, international migration and ethnic conflict, and European relations with the United States, Russia, and neighboring countries. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 382.
  • CAS PO 344: Democracy: Origins and Breakdown
    How do political scientists explain the emergence of democratic regimes? And what factors explain their breakdown? We look at these questions across a range of countries in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and other regions of the world. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "Comparative Political Development" that was numbered CAS PO 357.
  • CAS PO 350: The Making of Asia
    (Meets with CAS IR 275.) Explores the diverse experiences of modernization and development in China, Japan, Korea, as well as the countries of Southeast Asia. Also examines the domestic and international impacts of growing social-economic ties, as well as the complex security challenges among Asian states. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course titled "The Pacific Challenge" that was previously numbered CAS PO 350 and CAS PO 365.
  • CAS PO 351: China: from Revolution to Reform
    (Meets with CAS IR 370.) Explores the economic, political, and social upheavals that followed the Chinese revolution in 1949 and the cause of subsequent inauguration of reform in the late 1970s. Analyzes the tensions that brought about the 1989 upheaval in Tiananmen Square, as well as the implications of China's emergence as an economic power. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 369.
  • CAS PO 352: Rise of China
    (Meets with CAS IR 365.) China's political, economic, and strategic development since the late nineteenth century, with emphasis on the period since 1949. Examines three questions: In what ways is China rising? How did it happen? What are the impacts of China's rise on the U.S. and the global system? This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 374.
  • CAS PO 355: International Relations of South Asia
    Meets with CAS IR 372. Introduction to South Asia and regional conflict and cooperation. Focus on India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka inter-state relations; great power interventions; power distributions; norms; political, military, and economic conflict and cooperation. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 378.
  • CAS PO 356: Nuclear Security
    Meets with CAS IR 353. Provides students with the foundation for understanding nuclear security in the twenty-first century. Emphasis on the American Cold War experience, the growing threat of nuclear proliferation, the renaissance of civilian nuclear power, safeguards, and nuclear weapons under budget constraints.
  • CAS PO 357: Causes of War and Peace
    Meets with CAS IR 347. War is the most destructive social act in which humanity engages. Why does war happen? This question is addressed by focusing on a variety of scholarly explanations. Theoretical discussions are paired with an examination of historical cases.
  • CAS PO 360: Introduction to Latin American Politics and International Relations
    (Meets with CAS HI 399 and CAS IR 367.) Introduction to the patterns and complexities of Latin American politics and foreign policies. Focuses on the distinctive Latin American political experience and alternative explanation for it, including colonization, the international economy, and human and material resource capacity and utilization. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 367.
  • CAS PO 368: Introduction to Middle East Politics
    Meets with CAS IR 307. Employs social science theories to explain the political development of the Middle East since World War I. Part 1 examines state formation and competing explanations for authoritarianism. Part 2 analyzes social movements ranging from Islamist groups to mass mobilization.
  • CAS PO 373: African Politics Today
    (Meets with CAS IR 343.) An introduction to the issues dominating African political life today. Core course debates revolve around recent trends in African economic growth, democratic governance, and armed conflict, in addition to several other issues of contemporary concern.
  • CAS PO 376: Understanding Modern North Africa
    Meets with CAS IR 383. Considers political, cultural, economic, and social developments in the modern states of Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Libya as they struggle to gain independence from colonial domination and to consolidate viable, secure, and legitimate states and prosperous national communities. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 383.
  • CAS PO 377: Africa in International Politics
    Meets with CAS IR 351. Introduction to the international relations of post-colonial Africa. Core themes include the politics of post-independence international alignments, the external causes and effects of authoritarian rule, and Africa's role in the global political economy. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 390.
  • CAS PO 378: International Human Rights: Applying Human Rights in Africa
    Meets with CAS IR 352. Studies the growing international influence on politics of human rights principles, documents, and organizations, drawing especially on African cases such as Congo, Zimbabwe, and Sudan. Topics include universality vs. cultural relativism, individual vs. group rights, and issues in human rights enforcement. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 587.
  • CAS PO 380: Special Topics: International Relations in Political Science
    Topic for Fall 2017: Law, Morality, and Justice in Wars and Peace. An exploration of the scholastic, humanist, and international legalist traditions that attempted to codify and regulate warfare. Topics include Just War theory, terrorism, aerial bombing, drone strikes, torture, nuclear deterrence, and humanitarian intervention.
  • CAS PO 381: History of American Foreign Relations since 1898
    Meets with CAS HI 287. Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems.
  • CAS PO 384: Global Governance and International Organization
    Meets with CAS IR 373. Provides an overview of major theoretical perspectives on the creation and function of international organizations, comparative case studies of selected organizations, and an examination of present and future roles of international organizations in selected issue areas. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS PO 385.
  • CAS PO 390: Special Topics in Political Theory
    Topics vary. Topic for Fall 2017: Political Freedom. Examines the experience and dilemmas of political freedom thematized in political theory and practice. Drawing from an eclectic mix of genres we ask what political freedom is, how it arises, what blocks it, and how we sustain it.
  • CAS PO 391: Classical to Early Modern Political Theory
    Focuses on philosophical subjects relevant to ethics and politics, such as virtue and happiness; human nature and reason; qualifications of leadership; aims and means of civic education; and conceptions of law (man-made, natural, divine). Texts by Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli. Meets with CAS PH 453.