History

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  • CAS HI 280: Special Topics in American History
    Two topics are offered 2015/2016. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Fall 2015: Music and Civil Rights in America. Investigates the relationship between musical trends and campaigns for civil rights from the late nineteenth century to the present. Explores the social and cultural contexts in which distinct musical styles emerged and analyzes their broader political impact. Topic for Spring 2016: The Long 1980s. Explores American society, culture, and politics during a decade remarkable not only for its fashion, technology, and pop music but also for its battles over family values, "Reaganomics," the AIDS crisis, and the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • CAS HI 281: American Governance: Foreign Affairs, Politics, and Presidents in the Twentieth Century
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the Washington, D.C., Internship Program.
    Meets with CAS IR 356 E and CAS PO 201 E. Overview of American presidencies of the late twentieth century, specifically considering how politics relates to foreign policy in America. Concepts including isolationism, manifest destiny, moralism, rule of law, national self-interest, and terrorism are discussed. Special focus on Iraq and Afghanistan. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 356 E.
  • CAS HI 282: The Modern American Consumer
    Do we control consumer culture or does it control us? Explores the rise of mass marketing, advertising, branding, department stores, commercial amusements, and shoppertainment, with attention to gender, ethnicity, youth, and social class. Examines critiques and the politics of consumerism.
  • CAS HI 283: The Twentieth-Century American Presidency
    Examines the shifting role of the presidency in American politics, especially over the course of the twentieth century. Considers not only the accomplishments of individual presidents and institutional changes in the executive branch but also the evolving place of the presidency in American popular culture. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 372.
  • CAS HI 284: History of War
    Why do we make war? Nothing else so engages the human genius for creative destruction. From crossbows to nuclear fire, this course traces five centuries of war to uncover depths of depravity and cruelty and heights of sacrifice and suffering. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 307.
  • CAS HI 287: History of American Foreign Relations since 1898
    Analysis of the history of American foreign policy from the perspective of the changing world and regional international systems; emphasis on the effect of these systems and the impact of America on the creation and operation of international systems. Also offered as CAS PO 381. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 366.
  • CAS HI 288: American Foreign Policy Since 1945
    America's tradition and heritage in foreign policy. American foreign policy during the Cold War. Conflicting approaches to the formulation of American foreign policy in the current international environment. Domestic and institutional actors in policy formulation: Congress, media, Presidency, CIA, military. Also offered as CAS IR 376. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 376.
  • CAS HI 291: Politics of the American Environment
    When have Americans addressed declining resources and ecological deterioration? Why hasn't every environmental problem provoked a policy response? This course examines how debates over environmental rights and risks shaped U.S. political history from the country's beginning to the present. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 360.
  • CAS HI 292: Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US
    Surveys the history of corporations and private enterprise since the Civil War, disentangling the evolving relationships between business and government and tracing the influence of money, markets, and their managers in American communities from factories to the frontiers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title "Money, Markets & Managers: Economic History of the United States" that was previously numbered CAS HI 377.
  • CAS HI 294: American Evangelicalism
    Major trends in American Evangelicalism, from the colonial awakenings and religious reform to the contemporary Christian Right. Focus on how evangelicals have negotiated and shaped central tenets of American culture, including understandings of gender, race, performance, nation, sexuality, and economics. Also offered as CAS RN 368.
  • CAS HI 295: Religious Controversies and the Law
    Explores a major challenge faced by modern states, namely the regulation of religion. Case studies from Europe, North America, and Israel demonstrate the ways in which governments have weighed religious freedom against other social and legal values, rights, and needs. Also offered as CAS RN 295.
  • CAS HI 298: African American History
    The history of African Americans from African origins to the present; societies in West and West Central Africa, slavery and freedom in colonial America, Civil War and Reconstruction, freedom and struggles in a globalizing America-Reconstruction, civil rights and beyond. Also offered as CAS AA 371. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 371.
  • CAS HI 299: History of the Civil Rights Movement
    Through historical scholarship, oral history, documentary film, and excursions to local historic sites, this course explores how African Americans created a dynamic and multifaceted movement for civil and human rights from the 1950s to the present. Also offered as CAS AA 310. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 378.
  • CAS HI 300: American Popular Culture
    Examines how Americans have changed (and haven't) since the nineteenth century by exploring their curious beliefs, social and sexual practices, and changing understandings of selfhood. Topics include Victorian etiquette, modern city pleasures, racial stereotyping, dating rituals, family dynamics, and more. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 379.
  • CAS HI 301: A History of Women in the United States
    Examines the ideas and experiences of women in the United States from the 1600s through the late twentieth century. Considers the common factors that shaped women's lives as well as women's diverse class, ethnic, and regional experiences. Also offered as CAS AM 375. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 375.
  • CAS HI 302: Science and American Culture
    Examines the rise of the natural and human sciences as influential forces in American society. Considers why they gained considerable authority in realms of medicine and technology but have proven far more limited in their impact on morality and religion. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 368.
  • CAS HI 303: Sex, Love, Family: Relationships in Recent American History and Pop Culture
    Explores modern American romance and family dynamics, especially since the 1970s. Follows the life cycle from birth to death, surveying common milestones and rituals such as coming of age, coming out, getting married, or having a midlife crisis, and more.
  • CAS HI 304: Science and Religion: Dialogue and Debate
    Challenges conventional wisdom that science and religion have always been at war in Europe and North America. Explores their interactions, mutual existence, and conflict from Copernicus' claim that the earth revolved around the sun to contemporary debates about evolution. Also offered as CAS RN 369. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "Science and Christianity" that was previously numbered CAS HI 369.
  • CAS HI 305: American Thought and Culture, 1776-1900
    Examines how intellectuals constructed an "exceptional" American identity by adjusting provincial Protestant and Enlightenment traditions to the challenges of transnational democratic, Romantic, and secular thought. Topics include Transcendentalism, pro- and anti-slavery movements, philosophical idealism, literary realism, and Darwinian theories. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 373.
  • CAS HI 306: American Thought and Culture, 1900 to the Present
    Investigates how American thinkers brought about an intellectual revolution in three challenging moments: the naturalist revolt in pragmatic philosophy and modern art; progressive liberals' confrontations with radicalism and new conservatisms; and poststructuralists' uncertain leap beyond modernist science, religion, and humanities. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 374.