History

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  • CAS HI 215: The European Enlightenment
    How Europe became modern. The rise of science, critique of religion, and struggle for rights. The public sphere emerges: newspapers, Freemasons, coffee, salons, smut. The invention of a cosmopolitan republic of letters; Voltaire, Diderot, Kant, Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin. Also offered as CAS PO 393. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 314.
  • CAS HI 216: The Second Sex in European History
    Until recently, most people believed women a "second sex," inferior to men in mind and body. Exploring gender politics and women's lives from the Middle Ages to the present, this course charts a long struggle for equal rights and opportunities.
  • CAS HI 218: Power and Authority in Europe since World War I
    Explores the breakdown of tradition authority, the rise of authoritarianism, and the triumph of democracy in twentieth-century Europe. Examines changing notions of power and legitimacy through major events, including communist revolutions, fascist takeovers, wartime occupations, and the fall of the Berlin Wall. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "History of Contemporary Europe, 1900 to the Present" that was previously numbered CAS HI 232.
  • CAS HI 219: Jews in the Modern World
    Examines how Jewish society, religion, and political definition changed in relation to how Europe, and the world, became modern. Considers Jewish interaction with non-Jewish society from medieval Spain to Eastern Europe today and explores this relationship's creative and destructive products. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 223.
  • CAS HI 221: Catastrophe & Memory
    Examines the ways in which catastrophes, both natural and social, enter into cultural memory. Goal is to understand how events that seem to defy comprehension are represented in works of art and given a place in the memory of a culture. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title "Catastrophe and Cultural Memory" that was previously numbered CAS HI 248. Also offered as CAS PO 394.
  • CAS HI 225: Communications Revolutions from Language to Cyberspace
    History of communications revolutions from the origin of human language through writing to current global revolutions. Focus on the western socio-political matrix of communications technology, implications for both cognitive and social relations, and dilemmas created for cultures by the increased flow of information. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 348.
  • CAS HI 226: Cities and Cultures
    Examines the relationship between cultural expression and political, social, and economic change by focusing on cities such as Boston, Paris, London, Casablanca, and Johannesburg during times of intense creativity and upheaval. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 339.
  • CAS HI 229: The Great Powers and the Eastern Mediterranean
    The Eastern Mediterranean as center of Great Power confrontation. Its impact on wider international relations, the domestic political results, the role of sea power, and the origins, conduct, and resolution of wars. Also offered as CAS IR 325. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 344.
  • CAS HI 230: Special Topics in the History of Media
    Examines how newspapers, television, social media, tourism campaigns, textbooks, and other forms of media shape national identities, political goals, and cultural values over time. Topic for Fall 2015: Inventing the Modern Public. Traces the transformation of the concept of "publicity" from the era of coffee-houses, salons, and book-sellers to the age of electronic media, global networks, and mass manipulation. Explores the fate of public enlightenment in the digital age. Also offered as CAS PO 390.
  • CAS HI 234: Introduction to India and South Asia
    A survey of South Asian history from antiquity to the present. Considers pre-modern empires, the rise of the British Empire in South Asia, and the struggle for independence. Explores the modern politics and culture of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.
  • CAS HI 237: Reconstructing the African Past
    Explores the richness and diversity of a continent where oral histories and environmental settings have shaped society as much as written records. Considers Africa's critical place in the world from ancient Egypt and Ghana to the Asante and Ethiopian empires. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the courses with the same title that were previously numbered CAS HI 291 and CAS HI 347. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS HI 243: Britain and the European Question: The Confluence of History and Politics
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the London Internship Program.
    (Meets with CAS IR 392 E.) Historical and political overview of Britain's evolving relationship with Europe between 1945 and 1992 in the context of ongoing debates concerning national sovereignty and national modernization, losing an empire and maintaining a world role, and the "special relationship" with the United States.
  • CAS HI 244: England in the Middle Ages
    England's development from the Celtic Age to the Tudor dynasty. Emphasizes social and religious/intellectual changes within the broader context of England's unique political evolution from a strife-torn backwater to a leading European power. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 318.
  • CAS HI 245: Tudor England, 1485-1603
    A survey of that turbulent and volatile century that witnessed the apprenticeship of England for a role of world importance. Special attention to the development of state power, the growth of religious diversity, the major economic and social transformations, as well as the resulting cultural development. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 319.
  • CAS HI 246: London Since 1666: Imperial Capital to World City
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the London History & Literature Programme.
    Social, economic, and cultural history of London since 1666. How London developed from the modest- sized capital of England to the capital of the British Empire and the world's largest city, to the modern multicultural city of today's European Union and globalizing world. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 303 E.
  • CAS HI 247: The Making of Modern Britain
    How did a small island nation develop into a global superpower, and at what costs? This course charts Britain's ascendancy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on industrialization, colonial expansion, democratic institution building, and enlightenment thought. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 321.
  • CAS HI 248: Modern Britain, 1867 to Present
    A political, social, and cultural history of England with emphasis on the impact of the two world wars, the emergence of the welfare state, the loss of empire, and Britain's relations with Europe. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course titled "Twentieth-Century Britain" that was previously numbered CAS HI 322.
  • CAS HI 249: London Women's Social History from Aphra Behn to The Blitz
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the the London Internship Program.
    Examines the lives of women in London over the past three centuries from a social history perspective. Students work with primary source materials. Also offered as CAS WS 310 E.
  • CAS HI 250: British Youth Culture from 1950 to the Present
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the London Internship Program and completion of one university-level history course or one university-level sociology course.
    The impact of black and white cultures of America and Britain; also, the influence of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and British folk traditions in the context of social change in the second half of the twentieth century.
  • CAS HI 251: Cultural Capital: The History of Popular Culture in London
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: enrollment in the BU London Internship Programme.
    Traces the development of popular culture in London from the late eighteenth century to the present. Concerned with popular cultural "texts" as well as popular cultural sites. Organized chronologically, from the early origins of modern culture to the present. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 320 E.