History

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  • CAS HI 215: The European Enlightenment
    How Europe became modern. The rise of science, critique of religion, and struggle for rights. The public sphere emerges: newspapers, Freemasons, coffee, salons, smut. The invention of a cosmopolitan republic of letters; Voltaire, Diderot, Kant, Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin. Also offered as CAS PO 393. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 314.
  • CAS HI 216: The Second Sex in European History
    Until recently, most people believed women a "second sex," inferior to men in mind and body. Exploring gender politics and women's lives from the Middle Ages to the present, this course charts a long struggle for equal rights and opportunities.
  • CAS HI 221: Catastrophe & Memory
    Examines the ways in which catastrophes, both natural and social, enter into cultural memory. Goal is to understand how events that seem to defy comprehension are represented in works of art and given a place in the memory of a culture. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title "Catastrophe and Cultural Memory" that was previously numbered CAS HI 248. Also offered as CAS PO 394.
  • CAS HI 225: Communications Revolutions from Language to Cyberspace
    History of communications revolutions from the origin of human language through writing to current global revolutions. Focus on the western socio-political matrix of communications technology, implications for both cognitive and social relations, and dilemmas created for cultures by the increased flow of information. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 348.
  • CAS HI 229: The Great Powers and the Eastern Mediterranean
    The Eastern Mediterranean as center of Great Power confrontation. Its impact on wider international relations, the domestic political results, the role of sea power, and the origins, conduct, and resolution of wars. Also offered as CAS IR 325. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 344.
  • CAS HI 234: Introduction to India and South Asia
    A survey of South Asian history from antiquity to the present. Considers pre-modern empires, the rise of the British Empire in South Asia, and the struggle for independence. Explores the modern politics and culture of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.
  • CAS HI 237: Reconstructing the African Past
    Explores the richness and diversity of a continent where oral histories and environmental settings have shaped society as much as written records. Considers Africa's critical place in the world from ancient Egypt and Ghana to the Asante and Ethiopian empires. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the courses with the same title that were previously numbered CAS HI 291 and CAS HI 347. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS HI 244: England in the Middle Ages
    England's development from the Celtic Age to the Tudor dynasty. Emphasizes social and religious/intellectual changes within the broader context of England's unique political evolution from a strife-torn backwater to a leading European power. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 318.
  • CAS HI 245: Tudor England, 1485-1603
    A survey of that turbulent and volatile century that witnessed the apprenticeship of England for a role of world importance. Special attention to the development of state power, the growth of religious diversity, the major economic and social transformations, as well as the resulting cultural development. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 319.
  • CAS HI 247: The Making of Modern Britain
    How did a small island nation develop into a global superpower, and at what costs? This course charts Britain's ascendancy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on industrialization, colonial expansion, democratic institution building, and enlightenment thought. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 321.
  • CAS HI 248: Modern Britain, 1867 to Present
    A political, social, and cultural history of England with emphasis on the impact of the two world wars, the emergence of the welfare state, the loss of empire, and Britain's relations with Europe. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course titled "Twentieth-Century Britain" that was previously numbered CAS HI 322.
  • CAS HI 264: French Feudal Society, 496-1339
    The development after the barbarian invasions of a new society based on landholding and personal loyalties. Examination of its social tensions and warfare, the role of women, chivalry, the growth of towns and universities, and the centralism of Capetian and Valois kings. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 331.
  • CAS HI 266: French Revolution and Napoleon
    The French Revolution began with high ideals of liberty and equality but quickly dissolved into civil war, the Terror, and Napoleon's expansionist ambitions. From the fall of the Bastille to Waterloo, this course traces the revolution's successes, failures, and legacy. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 333.
  • CAS HI 272: The History of Imperial Russia
    Focuses on the history of Russia under the Romanov Dynasty and its establishment as a Eurasian power and empire. Emphasizes issues of religious, ethnic, and cultural diversity, modernization, reform and revolt, and the vexed question of Russian identity. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled "History of Russia, 1689-1917" that was previously numbered CAS HI 345 or the course that was numbered CAS HI 272 and previously entitled "Russia and Its Empires until 1900."
  • CAS HI 274: Topics in Modern Russian and Soviet History, 1861–1956
    Focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian and Soviet history with attention to political, socioeconomic, and cultural transformations as well as war, religion, thought, and ideology. Topics vary from year to year. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with entitled "Issues in Modern Russian and Soviet History, 1861-1956" that was previously numbered CAS HI 347 and CAS HI 274.
  • CAS HI 275: History of the Jews in Russia and Eastern Europe
    A comprehensive survey of the history of the Jewish communities of Poland, Russia, and Eastern Europe from the middle of the eighteenth century until today. Topics include economic, social, religious, cultural, and political developments affecting Jews and Europeans generally. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 337.
  • CAS HI 276: Jewish Culture
    What is "Jewish," or not, about "Jewish culture?" Examines how urbanization, Jewish assimilation, cosmopolitanism, and Jewish nationalism can be seen in music, art, literature, and theater. Looks at how cultural exchange between Jews and non-Jews helped shape our world today. This course may not be taken for credit in addition to the course by the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 343.
  • CAS HI 278: Central Europe
    Intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, and military history of the region between Germany and Russia, from the end of the Middle Ages to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 341. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 341.
  • CAS HI 279: Intimate Histories of War
    An analysis of the intimate, personal aspects of modern warfare through diaries, letters, songs, material culture, and more. Explores how the twentieth century's unprecedented global conflict penetrated everyday lives, affecting the bodies, vocabularies, and world views of men, women, and children.
  • CAS HI 280: Special Topics in American History
    Topic for Fall 2014: Wars, Peace, and Diplomacy. Why do wars occur? What constitutes peace and how is it maintained? What are the virtues and deficiencies of diplomacy as practitioners have sought to implement it? Readings center on international politics texts and the U.S. foreign policy record. Also offered as CAS PO 380.