Comparative Literature

View courses in

  • CAS XL 100: Introduction to Literature
    This writing course introduces students to techniques of academic writing through analysis of texts from a wide variety of literary traditions, and of adaptations inspired by those texts. May count for both CAS WR 100 and XL major or minor credit.
  • CAS XL 222: Introduction to Comparative Literature: Western Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of influential texts of the Western tradition from antiquity to present. Topics include genre, translation, appropriation, interpretation, theories of literary production and effect. All works read in English; no prerequisites. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 223: Introduction to Comparative Literature: Middle Eastern Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Hebrew literature. Readings may include The Arabian Nights, Shahnameh, lyric poetry, and novels from the twentieth century. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 224: Introduction to Comparative Literature: East Asian Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature. Readings may include The Tale of the Genji, Dream of the Red Chamber, and Nine-Cloud Dream. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 225: Introduction to Comparative Literature: South Asian Literature (in English translation)
    Topic for Spring 2015: Love in Indian Literature and Film. Exploration of the role that cinema has played in reinforcing or challenging the traditional representations of women protagonists in literary texts. Readings include premodern Indian literature and modern literature and films from South Asia. Also offered as CAS CI 390, CAS LN 225, and CAS XL 381. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 260: Gateway to Asian Cultures
    Panoramic introduction to the cultures of East and South Asia in comparative perspective (China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, India). Examines shared foundations, transformative inflection points, sites, peoples, and ideologies over the past two millennia through primary texts and media. Also offered as CAS LC 260, CAS LJ 260, CAS LK 260, AND CAS LN 260.
  • CAS XL 281: Holocaust Literature and Film (in English translation)
    Questions of representation in literature and film about the Holocaust, including testimonial and fictive works by Wiesel and Levi, Ozick, and others; films include documentaries and feature films. Discussions of the Holocaust as historical reality, metaphor, and generative force in literature. Also offered as CAS CI 269 and CAS RN 385.
  • CAS XL 315: Film and Identity in the Islamic World
    Introduction to film history in the Islamic world, correlated with literary history. Topic for Fall 2015: From Page to Screen: Film Adaptations of Persian and Arabic Literature. In this course we explore film, and other media, adaptations of Arabic and Persian literature. Students examine competing theories of adaptation and the historical changes that have occurred in film production in the Arab world and Iran. Also offered as CAS CI 390 A1 and CAS LY 470 A1.
  • CAS XL 342: Travel Writing and the Muslim World
    How have Muslim travelers past and present written about places and people they saw abroad, and how have Western travelers in the Muslim lands described their travels in "the East"? Readings include Nasir Khusraw, Ibn Battuta, Eliza Fay, and Robert Byron.
  • CAS XL 351: The Faust Tradition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: one literature course or consent of instructor.
    Comparative study of the Faust theme, 1500 to present: Marlowe, Goethe, Mann, Gertrude Stein, Jan Svankmajer, others. Transmission and adaptation of literary themes within and between national traditions. Emphasis on close reading and research, use of theory and criticism. Meets with CAS LG 283.
  • CAS XL 381: Topics in Gender and Literature (in English translation)
    Topic for Spring 2015: Love in Indian Literature and Film. Exploration of the role that cinema has played in reinforcing or challenging the traditional representations of women protagonists in literary texts. Readings include premodern Indian literature and modern literature and films from South Asia. Also offered as CAS CI 390, CAS LN 225, and CAS XL 225.
  • CAS XL 382: Topics in Gender and Film (in English translation)
    Topic for Fall 2014: Gender in East Asian Film. What roles have cinematic representations played in constructing or challenging gender norms in twentieth century East Asia? How have images of sexuality evolved across linguistic and cultural boundaries in East Asia? Films from China, Japan, and Korea. No prerequisites. Also offered as CAS LC 470 A1, CAS LJ 451 B1, and CAS LK 470 A1.
  • CAS XL 383: Dante's Hell (in English translation)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: one literature course.
    A close reading of one text, Dante Alighieri's Inferno, with attention to its medieval contexts: philosophical, theological, and historical. Analysis of the poetic means by which Dante represents both human evil and human hope. Bilingual text. Lectures and discussions in English. Also offered as CAS LI 555 and CAS RN 555.
  • CAS XL 384: Arthurian Literature
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: two literature courses or consent of instructor.
    Topic for Spring 2014: Arthurian Traditions. Tradition and innovation in works of literature, painting, and film inspired by King Arthur's court (6th-21st centuries). Themes include spiritual and erotic love; history and imagination; conquest and nationalism; memory and forgetting; tropes of quest; sin and redemption. Conducted in English.
  • CAS XL 386: Africa on Screen
    Introduction to the history and analysis of African film. Topics include traditional practices and social change; education; popular culture; immigration; gender roles; sexuality. Discussion of films by Sembene, Mambety, Faye, Folly, Teno, Kobhio.
  • CAS XL 401: Sr Indep Work
  • CAS XL 402: Sr Indep Work
  • CAS XL 441: 1001 Nights in the World Literary Imagination
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: two literature courses or consent of instructor.
    What is The Thousand and One Nights? How has this ever-expanding collection appealed to its diverse audiences? Focus on Nights structure and themes, notable translations and offshoots in western literature and art, and later appropriations by Arab and Muslim writers. Also offered as CAS EN 590 and CAS LY 441.
  • CAS XL 459: Primo Levi Within Holocaust Literature
    A study of Primo Levi's writings and scientific, literary, theological, and philosophical approaches to the Holocaust. Other theorists (Arendt, Wiesel, and Müller-Hill) and other survivors' testimonies (Delbo, Borowski, Fink) are read in conjunction with Levi's works. Also offered as CAS LI 459 and RN 459.
  • CAS XL 470: Topics in Comparative Literature
    Two topics are offered Fall 2015. Students may take one or both for credit. Section A1: Istanbul Across Centuries. The image of the city of Istanbul in novels, autobiography, short story, poetry, as well as music videos and popular films. Themes include modernization, urbanization, isolation, cosmopolitanism, and the struggle between East and West. Also offered as CAS LT 281 A1. Section B1: The Story of the Stone. A masterpiece of world literature depicts the interworkings of love, tragedy, honor, and drama within a Buddho-Daoist cosmos set in the everyday life of Chinese Confucianism. This course emphasizes the religious traditions of Chinese culture. Also offered as CAS RN 526 A1 and CAS LC 470 B1.