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  • CAS SO 440: Seminar: Political Sociology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    Explores the "deep cultural" level behind the daily conduct of politics. A theoretical framework relying upon Tocqueville and Weber is developed and then applied to unveil the political cultures of the United States, Germany, England, Russia, and Mexico.
  • CAS SO 444: Seminar: Sociology of Education
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    Explores how learning is executed in different settings and persons are selected to fit in various parts of our culture and how the institution of education contributes to social stability and change. Contemporary educational reforms are reviewed and their effects are analyzed.
  • CAS SO 448: Culture, Markets, and Inequality
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    This seminar examines commerce as a cultural process, focusing on cultural production and consumption practices in fields like fashion, music, and bodily goods and services. Traces the cultural construction and maintenance of gender, race, and class inequalities in markets.
  • CAS SO 452: Contemporary Debates in Sexualities Research
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses, one of which must be CAS SO 240; or consent of instructor.
    Engages debates about sexual identities, practices, and communities, conceptualizing sexuality as both a social construct and an institution. Students consider how sexualities operate across social contexts, their effects on systems of inequalities, and their intersections with race, class, and gender.
  • CAS SO 457: Seminar: Sociology of Mind
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    Illustrates the various sociological approaches to "mental" phenomena and elucidates some recent developments in cognitive sociology.
  • CAS SO 462: Seminar: Great Theorists
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    This seminar examines the ideas of Montesquieu, Saint-Simon, Wollstonecraft, Tocqueville, Martineau, Spencer, Pareto, Veblen, Simmel, and Du Bois through critiques of these seminal concepts: "relative deprivation," "the survival of the fittest," "conspicuous consumption," "the circulation of elites," and "double consciousness."
  • CAS SO 491: Directed Study
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: approval of CAS Advising Office, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor.
    Individual instruction and supervised study project in sociology for concentrators and nonconcentrators.
  • CAS SO 492: Directed Study
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: approval of CAS Advising Office, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor.
    Individual instruction and supervised study project in sociology for concentrators and nonconcentrators.
  • CAS SO 521: Seminar: Epidemiology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    This seminar analyzes the social and biological determinants of population health differences in a global context. Students examine gender and the health effects of inequality, political upheaval, historical trauma, environmental injustice, migration, and social policies.
  • CAS SO 534: Global Sociology
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    Examines different sociological perspectives on global social dynamics and processes.
  • CAS SO 541: Modernity Seminar I
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    This seminar looks at the phenomenon of modernity from a multidisciplinary point of view. Discussed are the cultural foundations of modernity, specifically and primarily nationalism but also Romanticism, science, and major political ideologies. Also analyzed are modernization and development as studied by the social sciences, modernism, and postmodernism in literary and cultural studies; and the nature of human beings and society in the perspectives of modern philosophy. Also offered as CAS AN 541. Either or both of SO 541 and SO 543 may be taken for credit.
  • CAS SO 543: Modernity Seminar II
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses, one of which must be CAS SO 541; or consent of instructor.
    This seminar looks at the phenomenon of modernity from a multidisciplinary point of view. Discussed are the cultural foundations of modernity, specifically and primarily nationalism but also Romanticism, science, and major political ideologies. Also analyzed are modernization and development as studied by the social sciences, modernism, and postmodernism in literary and cultural studies; and the nature of man and society in the perspectives of modern philosophy. Also offered as CAS AN 543. Either or both of SO 541 and SO 543 may be taken for credit.
  • CAS SO 559: Seminar: Deviance and Social Control
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and at least two previous sociology courses; or consent of instructor.
    Sociological explanations of types of deviancy and methods of controlling it. Students select research topics ranging from behaviors and conditions perceived as deviant (e.g., crime, terrorism, sexual deviance, addictions) to methods of control (e.g., law, medical treatment, social exclusion, war).
  • CAS WR 097: English Grammar and Composition (ESL only)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: placement test results.
    Study of conventions of academic writing along with review of grammar and mechanics. Emphasis on comprehension, summary, and critical analysis of a wide range of readings. Focus on accuracy and fluency in writing and speaking. Frequent papers and in-class writing.
  • CAS WR 098: Introduction to College Reading and Writing in English (ESL only)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS WR 097; or placement test results.
    Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation. Various theme-based readings. Multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations.
  • CAS WR 100: Writing Seminar
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS WR 098; (if student required to take that course).
    Topic-based seminar in academic reading and writing. Attention to reading and analyzing primary and secondary sources, argumentation, prose style, revision, and citation. Significant writing and individual conferences.
  • CAS WR 150: Writing and Research Seminar
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: CAS WR 100.
    Topic-based seminar in academic reading, writing, and research. Continuing attention to argumentation, prose style, revision, and citation, with additional emphasis on college-level research. Significant writing and individual conferences.
  • CAS WR 202: Children's Literature in the Elementary School
    An introduction to the world of children's literature. Classics and exemplary modern works are studied, with a particular focus on literary techniques, nonfiction text structures, cultural diversity, and gender. Covers children's literature recommended by Massachusetts English Language Arts Framework (2001).
  • CAS WR 598: Tutoring in ESL
    Prepares Writing Center tutors to work effectively with ESL and multilingual students. Modules balance theory and practice. Tutors gain knowledge about ESL writing and pedagogical ability to help students become independent writers. No familiarity with linguistics or language teaching required.
  • CAS WS 101: Gender and Sexuality I: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
    Introduction to women's, gender, and sexuality studies, integrating approaches from the natural and social sciences and humanities, focused on the origins, diversity, and expression of gendered and sexed individuals. Topics include the evolutionary origin of sexes; evolution, development, and social construction of sex differences; sexual differences, similarities, and diversity in bodies, brains, behavior, and artistic and intellectual expressions. Team-taught. Students who complete both halves of the two-semester sequence WS 101/102 receive divisional studies credit for two courses, from two different divisions: Natural Science (without lab), Social Science, and/or Humanities. Neither WS 101 nor WS 102 alone carries divisional studies credit.