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  • CAS XL 315: Film and Identity in the Islamic World
    Introduction to film history in the Islamic world, correlated with literary history. Topic for Fall 2015: From Page to Screen: Film Adaptations of Persian and Arabic Literature. In this course we explore film, and other media, adaptations of Arabic and Persian literature. Students examine competing theories of adaptation and the historical changes that have occurred in film production in the Arab world and Iran. Also offered as CAS CI 390 A1 and CAS LY 470 A1. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
  • CAS XL 342: Travel Writing and the Muslim World
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).
    How have Muslim travelers past and present written about places and people they saw abroad, and how have Western travelers in the Muslim lands described their travels in "the East"? Readings include Nasir Khusraw, Ibn Battuta, Eliza Fay, and Robert Byron. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-intensive Course.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • CAS XL 343: Alexander the Great in the East
    Study of the various narratives about Alexander the Great, also known as Sikandar or Iskandar, as conqueror, philosopher-king, and hero, in medieval Middle Eastern and Asian literatures. Modern filmic representations of the historical figure are also compared. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
  • CAS XL 351: The Faust Tradition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: one literature course or consent of instructor.
    Comparative study of the Faust theme, 1500 to present: Marlowe, Goethe, Mann, Gertrude Stein, Jan Svankmajer, others. Transmission and adaptation of literary themes within and between national traditions. Emphasis on close reading and research, use of theory and criticism. Meets with CAS LG 283.
  • CAS XL 381: Topics in Gender and Literature (in English translation)
    Topic for Fall 2018: Change and Continuity on the Silk Road. Focused on the Central Asian portion of the Silk Road from the border of China to Istanbul students explore written and visual texts to understand shifts in gender dynamics in societies caught between Islam, communism, and globalization. Also offered as CAS WS 304 B1.
  • CAS XL 382: Topics in Gender and Film (in English translation)
    Topic for Spring 2018: Middle East Gender and Globalization. Exploration of the intersection of gender, sexuality, and globalization in Middle Eastern films. Analysis and interrogation of films' contributions to the construction of gender and sexual norms in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Also offered as CAS CI 390 C1 and CAS WS 303 B1.
  • CAS XL 383: Dante's Hell (in English translation)
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: one literature course.
    A close reading of one text, Dante Alighieri's Inferno, with attention to its medieval contexts: philosophical, theological, and historical. Analysis of the poetic means by which Dante represents both human evil and human hope. Bilingual text. Lectures and discussions in English. Also offered as CAS LI 555 and CAS RN 555.
  • CAS XL 384: Arthurian Literature
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: two literature courses or consent of instructor.
    Topic for Fall 2016: Arthurian Traditions. Tradition and innovation in works of literature, paintings, and films inspired by King Arthur's court (6th-21st centuries). Themes include spiritual and erotic love; history and imagination; conquest and nationalism; memory and forgetting; tropes of quest; sin and redemption. Conducted in English. Also offered as CAS EN 390 B1 and CAS LF 430 A1.
  • CAS XL 385: Dante: The Divine Comedy II: Purgatorio and Paradiso
    Focus on the literary, philosophical, and theological ideas Dante uses to represent his experience of himself and of human nature. Bi-lingual texts. Lectures and discussions in English. Also offered as CAS LI 556 and CAS RN 556.
  • CAS XL 386: Africa on Screen
    Introduction to the history and analysis of African film. Topics include traditional practices and social change; education; popular culture; immigration; gender roles; sexuality. Discussion of films by Sembene, Mambety, Faye, Folly, Teno, Kobhio. Also offered as CAS CI 390 B1.
  • CAS XL 387: The Holocaust Through Film
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).
    An examination of film using the Holocaust as its central topic. What are the political and cultural effects when genocide is represented through film? Can feature films portray history, and if so, what are the consequences for an informed society? This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-intensive Course.
    • Historical Consciousness
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • CAS XL 401: Sr Indep Work
  • CAS XL 402: Sr Indep Work
  • CAS XL 441: 1001 Nights in the World Literary Imagination
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: two literature courses or consent of instructor and First Year Writing Seminar (e.g., WR 100 or WR 120).
    What is The Thousand and One Nights? How has this ever-expanding collection appealed to its diverse audiences? Focus on Nights' structure and themes, notable translations and offshoots in western literature and art, and later appropriations by Arab and Muslim writers. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-intensive Course.
    • Aesthetic Exploration
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive Course
  • CAS XL 459: Primo Levi Within Holocaust Literature
    A study of Primo Levi's writings and scientific, literary, theological, and philosophical approaches to the Holocaust. Other theorists (Arendt, Wiesel, and Muller-Hill) and other survivors' testimonies (Delbo, Borowski, Fink) are read in conjunction with Levi's works. Also offered as CAS LI 459 and RN 459.
  • CAS XL 470: Topics in Comparative Literature
    May be taken for credit if topic is different. Four topics are offered Fall 2018. Section A1: Queer Theory. Surveys major texts and arguments in queer theory from Butler's Gender Trouble to contemporary discussions of cisnormativity, homonationalism, affect, pinkwashing, crip theory, and queer-of-color critique. Explores different uses of queer theory in legal debates, literary analysis, and cultural criticism. Also offered as CAS WS 305 A1. Section B1: Modern Chinese Lit&Film. A seminar on the major works of modern Chinese literature and cinema from the May Fourth period to the present, with a focus on close reading and textual analysis. Students will study changing patterns of creative expression in modern Chinese cultures and learn to analyze the relations between literary experiments and historical contexts. Also offered as CAS CI 490 and CAS LC 470 A1. Section C1: Murakami and His American Sources. Examines elements of postmodernism and intertextuality in the work of the world's best-selling Japanese writer. Readings in Murakami and his literary, cultural, and cinematic influences: Poe, Conrad, Fitzgerald, Chandler, Vonnegut, Carver, Irving, and others. Also offered as CAS EN 390 A1 and CAS LJ 451 A1. Section D1: Before Haiku. What goes into a haiku? How does it make us think? Course explores these questions by tracing haiku's origins in the Japanese poetic tradition. Examines the form's relationship to thought and perception. Readings in English with Japanese originals available. Also offered as CAS LJ 451 B1.
  • CAS XL 479: WLL Senior Seminar
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: senior standing majors in WLL, or consent of instructor.
    Through discussions of intercultural reading and translation, bibliographic assignments, student presentations, workshops, and work with a faculty language mentor, seniors majoring in WLL use this course to develop their final project: a substantial scholarly paper, translation, or creative work in a foreign language.
  • CAS XL 491: Directed Study: Comparative Literature
    Application form available in department.
  • CAS XL 492: Directed Study: Comparative Literature
    Application form available in department.
  • CAS XL 540: Theory and Practice of Literary Translation
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: competence in a second language.
    Weekly series of presentations by translators from Boston and elsewhere, open to registered students and to the public. Registered students complete special projects and attend workshops.