Courses

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  • CAS WS 102: Gender and Sexuality II: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
    Introduction to women's, gender, and sexuality studies, focused on communities and institutions. Integrates approaches from the natural and social sciences and humanities, including evolutionary, historical, and cross-cultural analyses, feminist and queer theory. Topics include human reproductive biology; patriarchy and sexual violence; parenting, kinship structures, and forms of intimacy; sexual selection; the construction of gender identity and sexual orientation; evolutionary medicine; and the relationship of academic research to social activism. Team-taught. Students who complete both halves of the two-semester sequence WS 101/102 receive divisional studies credit for two courses, from two different divisions: Natural Science (without lab), Social Science, and/or Humanities. Neither WS 101 nor WS 102 alone carries divisional studies credit.
  • CAS WS 213: Sexism in the Twenty-First Century
    Examines the dynamics of contemporary institutions as they affect women's and men's lives, particularly in the United States-- the economy, politics, mass media and culture, the beautification industry, sex industries, and hook-up culture-- through the intersections of race, class, ethnicity, and sexual identity. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS WS 113.
  • CAS WS 214: Creating Women: Gendering Literature, Art, and Music
    Considers how gender shapes the creative work of women writers, artists, and musicians and how women's artistic work contributes to understanding the social, cultural, and political history of women. Attention also to sexuality, race, ethnicity, class. Carries CAS Humanities divisional credit. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS WS 114.
  • CAS WS 241: Sociology of Gender
    An introduction to the social construction of sex and gender with a focus on the economic, political, social, and cultural forces that shape gender relations. Examines gender as a social structure that patterns institutional inequalities and everyday interactions on society. Also offered as CAS SO 241.
  • CAS WS 305: Critical Issues in Women's Studies
    Two topics are offered Fall 2013. Students may take one or both for credit. Topic for Sections A1 and B1: Women and Comedy. From Mae West and 1930s screwball comediennes to Tina Fey and female stand-up comics today, the course explores funny women, women's humor, what women find funny, and how women use humor as a tool for survival, resistance, and subversion. Topic for Section C1: Gender and Sexuality in Middle Eastern Film. A study of Middle Eastern representations of the controversies, trade-offs and dilemmas surrounding the impact of globalization on men and women, through Egyptian, Iranian, and Turkish film and literature. Also offered as CAS XL 382.
  • CAS WS 340: Women, Race, and Gender in Mass Media
    Develops students' media literacy through hands-on analysis of media and pop culture representations of women, femininity, and race; their relation to women's lived experience; and the place of "feminine" values in contemporary culture.
  • CAS WS 344: Images of Women in Popular Fiction
    Formulaic genres--fairy tales, romance fiction, detective novels, horror stories, and science fiction--offer a medium for tracing the development of representations of women. Course analyzes women's roles and functions in these genres, focusing on novels by American authors.
  • CAS WS 346: Women and Film
    Study of principally American films, exploring how the medium has shaped and been shaped by cultural perceptions of women. Readings provide background for interpretation of films ranging from screwball comedy to film noir, "women's films," and films by women directors.
  • CAS WS 348: Gender and International Development
    Analysis of significant gender disparities worldwide in education, livelihoods, crisis settings, and political voice. Interdisciplinary approach combines discussion of novels, films, research on development, and lessons from field experience. Ideas on the advancement of gender equality and women's socio-economic empowerment.
  • CAS WS 350: Women and Politics
    Readings, discussion, and field research on issues of women's relationship to the processes of political influence, change, and empowerment. Analysis of public policy related to women and children. Also offered as CAS PO 309.
  • CAS WS 360: Global Feminism: Race and Gender in International Perspectives
    (Meets with CAS IR 358 E.) Exploration of critical issues concerning women, gender, and race throughout the world. Topics include women and the global economy, health care, reproduction, the dynamics of sex industries, violence against women, international women's movements, and political/institutional change.
  • CAS WS 491: Directed Study: Women's and Gender Studies
    Individual instruction and supervised study project in women's or gender studies. Application form available in program office.
  • CAS WS 492: Directed Study: Women's and Gender Studies
    Individual instruction and supervised study project in women's or gender studies. Application form available in program office.
  • CAS XL 222: Introduction to Comparative Literature: Western Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of influential texts of the Western tradition from antiquity to present. Topics include genre, translation, appropriation, interpretation, theories of literary production and effect. All works read in English; no prerequisites. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 223: Introduction to Comparative Literature: Middle Eastern Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Hebrew literature. Readings may include The Arabian Nights, Shahnameh, lyric poetry, and novels from the twentieth century. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 224: Introduction to Comparative Literature: East Asian Literature (in English Translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature. Readings may include The Tale of the Genji, Dream of the Red Chamber, and Nine-Cloud Dream. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 225: Introduction to Comparative Literature: South Asian Literature (in English translation)
    Introduces basic methods of comparative literary study through close readings of some of the most influential texts of South Asia from the classical, medieval, and modern traditions. Readings may include the Ramayana, Gitagovinda, devotional poetry, and novels from the twentieth century. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • CAS XL 342: Travel Writing and the Muslim World
    How have Muslim travelers past and present written about places and people they saw abroad, and how have Western travelers in the Muslim lands described their travels in "the East"? Readings include Nasir Khusraw, Ibn Battuta, Eliza Fay, and Robert Byron.
  • CAS XL 351: The Faust Tradition
    Undergraduate Prerequisites: one literature course or consent of instructor.
    Comparative study of the Faust theme, 1500 to present: Marlowe, Goethe, Mann, Gertrude Stein, Jan Svankmajer, others. Transmission and adaptation of literary themes within and between national traditions. Emphasis on close reading and research, use of theory and criticism. Meets with CAS LG 283.
  • CAS XL 381: Topics in Gender and Literature (in English translation)
    Topic for Spring 2013: Middle Eastern Women Write. Exploration of feminist movements in the Middle East through works of literature. The impact on gender of colonialism, revolution, and migration. Also offered as CAS WS 305 B1.