In the heart of Rabat’s medina, students live, learn, and explore the language and culture of North Africa and the Middle East. The Rabat Arabic Studies Program immerses students into the language and the culture of this region of the world through life in Morocco’s cosmopolitan capital city. Along with an intensive study of Arabic language, students explore the history, politics, and religion of this ever-changing part of the world via coursework, homestays, and excursions. This experience is highlighted by an all-inclusive, week-long adventure through Morocco, visiting exciting destinations such as Marrakesh, Fez, and the Erg Lihoudi Desert.

  • Open to students at all levels of Arabic. (One semester of Arabic language is recommended.)
  • Admissions requirements for all programs.
  • Language courses carry prerequisites.
Students enroll in two intensive language courses offered at the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels. Participants are placed into language courses based on in-country oral proficiency interviews, written exams, and previous coursework. In addition, students register for two 4-credit electives. Electives are taught in English. Upon successful completion of the program, students will earn a total of 16 academic credits. Note: Syllabi are for course approval and reference only. Students will receive up-to-date syllabi when their courses begin.

Required Courses

Students enroll in two Arabic language courses according to their level.

  • CAS LY 111 Elementary Modern Arabic I (4 credits)
    • The essentials of standard Arabic, the idioms used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 112 Elementary Modern Arabic II (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 111: Elementary Modern Arabic I, or the equivalent.
    • The essentials of standard Arabic, the idioms used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 211 Second-Year Modern Arabic I (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 112: Elementary Modern Arabic II, or the equivalent.
    • Completes the process of presenting the basic structures of modern formal Arabic, concentrating on weak verb forms, more complicated sentence formation, and more sophisticated expression in speech and writing. Vocabulary expansion and better root-pattern identification skills are also stressed.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 212 Second-Year Modern Arabic II (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 211: Second-Year Modern Arabic I, or the equivalent.
    • Completes the process of presenting the basic structures of modern formal Arabic, concentrating on weak verb forms, more complicated sentence formation, and more sophisticated expression in speech and writing. Vocabulary expansion and better root-pattern identification skills are also stressed.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 303 Third-Year Modern Arabic I (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 212: Second-Year Modern Arabic II, or the equivalent.
    • Advanced reading, composition, grammar review, listening skills, and conversation in Modern Standard Arabic as well as major dialects such as the Cairine or the Gulf dialect.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 304 Third-Year Modern Arabic II (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 303: Third-Year Modern Arabic I, or the equivalent.
    • Continuing advanced reading, advanced composition; grammar review, listening skills, and conversation in Modern Standard Arabic as well as major dialects such as the Cairine or the Gulf dialect
    •  Syllabus
  • CAS LY 403 Advanced Arabic I (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 304: Third-Year Modern Arabic II, or the equivalent.
    • Advanced-level reading and discussion in Modern Standard Arabic of media reports, scholarly articles, modern literary texts, and excerpts from classical writings. Student compositions and presentations in Arabic on topics related to readings.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS LY 404 Advanced Arabic II (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS LY 403: Advanced Arabic I, or the equivalent.
    • Advanced conversation and composition course in conjunction with the study of famous literary and cinematographic works of the Arabic-speaking world.

Elective Courses

Students register for the following electives. (Taught in English)

  • CAS HI 354/RN 346 History, Islam and Politics in the Middle East and North Africa (4 credits)
    • Formerly CAS HI 384
    • This course focuses on the history, politics, and culture of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. It will take a social and cultural approach to history to try to better understand the nature of political authority, the complex relationships between Islam and politics, secularization, social movements, the challenges of democracy, and constructions of gender relationships in the MENA region.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS IR 460 Security Studies and Foreign Policy: Europe and MENA (Middle East and North Africa) (4)
    • Explores how the colonial experience shaped North African and Middle Eastern culture and society, and how the North African postcolonial state negotiated the legacy of colonialism and responded to the dynamics underpinning global politics.
    • Syllabus


The Global Learning Experience: An Online Course

Students in all Fall and Spring programs have the opportunity to enroll in The Global Learning Experience at no additional cost.

  • CAS IP101: The Global Learning Experience (1 credit)
    • All program participants have the opportunity to make the most of their semester abroad with The Global Learning Experience, a self-paced, Pass/Fail course with brief readings and experiential assignments that accompany them while living and studying in a country and culture different from their own. Students post their work, experiences and observations to an online platform to trace and articulate their achievements abroad from an academic, personal and professional standpoint. The course links students with the faculty instructors as well as peers studying on other BU Study Abroad programs around the world. Students earn one credit in addition to the total program credits mentioned below at no additional cost.

Local Homestay

  • 1 student per household. Private bedroom, shared home with family, including shared bathrooms.
  • Kitchen available for occasional use with permission from host.
  • Full board included. Breakfast and dinner are provided by the host families; lunch is provided by the CCCL on weekdays. Weekend lunch is provided by host families.
  • Laundry facilities in homes - dryers should not be expected. Homes may or may not have hot water. Internet access should not be expected.
  • Study, common space, and library at Center for Cross-Cultural Learning, local area café's. Personal Wi-Fi access is provided.

 

  • Fall Semester: early September to late December

Please note: This program is only offered during the Fall Semester.

  • Fall Semester: March 15