Los Angeles offers opportunities found nowhere else in the United States. For students interested in any sort of media experience—acting, writing, production, or advertising/public relations—LA is the place to be. Academics and practical experience are intertwined in each of the five Los Angeles programs, and students benefit from the real-life knowledge of their professors. The Los Angeles Internship Program, offered for undergraduate and graduate students in the fall and spring semesters, has three tracks that give students the chance to study and work in the heart of the film, television, advertising and public relations, and entertainment management and law industries. Courses are taught by Boston University faculty and alumni who serve as mentors in and out of the classroom.

Students take three courses concurrently with their internship. Students typically work at one or two internships for a minimum of 20 hours per week—in some cases, up to 40 hours per weekand continue to meet with their internship coordinator during the semester.

The program offers three tracks from which undergraduate and graduate students can choose: Advertising & Public Relations, Film & Television, and Entertainment Management. Graduated students have the opportunity to continue their education by enrolling in the Los Angeles Certificate Program, where students can choose either the Acting in Hollywood track or The Writer in Hollywood track. Note: Syllabi are for course approval and reference only. Students will receive up-to-date syllabi when their courses begin.

Advertising & Public Relations Track
Required Courses

Students take the following two courses:

  • COM CM 563 Entertainment Marketing (4 credits)
    • This course surveys the strategy, techniques, and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create, and distribute video, film, print, interactive, and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research, and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 564 Entertainment Promotion: Speaker Series (4)
    • The course will showcase agents, managers, publicists, and studio executives, among others, who will discuss their role and real-life experience in developing and guiding an entertainment project (be it a movie, play, book, or music) to success. The course surveys the nuts-and-bolts of taking an entertainment project from the ground up with emphasis on doing so in the digital age of the 21st century.
    • Syllabus
Elective Courses

Students choose one elective course:

  • COM FT 539 Professional Production Methods (4)
    • To introduce film and television students to professional-quality production techniques, suppliers, and equipment through field trips, speakers in the PLB classroom, and film and video shoots, vendors, and post-production facilities. The class will primarily consist of required excursions; it will also include lectures, guest speakers, screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations. The class meetings will be informal, striving for an open exchange of ideas, points of view, experiences, and difficulties encountered in film and video production. Students are encouraged to participate in an open forum of discussions regarding techniques, problems encountered related to directing and producing skills, and so forth. We also discuss potential solutions to problems, some of which are routinely encountered in the film industry.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 566 The Business of Hollywood (4)
    • A practical analysis of the film and television industries: a general overview of the business of entertainment and the balancing act between art and commerce. How to evaluate, acquire, develop, package, promote, sell, finance, produce, and market motion picture and television product. Where to begin, how to apply what you’ve learned in the classroom to the marketplace, and how to land your first and second jobs. Understanding the personalities and social constructs of the industry and how to navigate your way through the industry and make a career for yourself in film and television.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 584 The Creative Life in Television (4)
    • Prerequisite: This course is open to COM students or those who have taken and passed a course in communications, creative writing, theater or film studies, acting, or literary study at the college level. This course is oriented to students who have a solid background in television and in the industry. It is not an introductory course.
    • This course will follow the life and death of a television season. We examine what makes it on the air, why it gets there, who creates it, who sells it, who buys it, and who is going to pay for it. We look at the cultural, political, and commercial forces that shape the creative environment. The course examines the struggle of the networks to survive in a rapidly changing environment and in the face of new technologies. And as the dinosaurs die, we look at the new opportunities this era of change offers for fresh talent.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 585 Careers in Hollywood (4)
    • A series of symposium-like evenings with industry professionals speaking primarily on those topics covered in COM FT 566 The Business of Hollywood. Some classes will reflect topics covered in COM FT 584 The Creative Life in Television. Students will be given the opportunity for up close and personal interaction with some of the industry’s movers and shakers. An opportunity to network with industry alumni as well as non-alumni professionals.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom SI 438/COM FT 438 Talent Representation, Management, and Contracts (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite for BU Questrom students: Questrom OB 221.
    • Prerequisite for non-Boston University students: Organizational Behavior.
    • No prerequisite for BU COM students.
    • Participants in this course will be offered a rare, hands-on opportunity to peer behind the historically closed doors of talent agencies, personal management companies, entertainment law firms, and other representation team members. Utilizing case studies and business models, the class members will examine the manner in which these critical players interact and attempt to work together on behalf of clients. Participants will gain an understanding of the different areas of talent representation, how each one functions in the scope of a client’s career and what the position responsibilities are in each area of representation. Readings and research projects will focus on current approaches to negotiation.
    • Syllabus
Internship Course

Study marketing techniques and media and consumer behavior while working in the marketing or PR departments of multinational firms, advertising agencies, or public relations agencies. Previous internship placements have included TBWA-Chiat/Day, Saatchi & Saatchi, Ogilvy & Mather, BWR, mPRm, Initiative, Dreamworks Marketing, ABC/Disney Marketing, and BNC.

  • Please note that these are examples of past internship placements only. While Study Abroad guarantees an internship to program participants, specific placements vary from semester to semester and may not always be available. Likewise, internship placements may be available in academic areas not listed.
  • Syllabus
Entertainment Management Track

The Entertainment Management track is available during the spring semester only.

Required Course

Students take one of the following courses:

  • Questrom LA 430 Entertainment Law (4 credits)
    • Recommended for BU students: Questrom LA 245
    • Recommended for non-Boston University Students: Introduction to Business Law
    • This survey class covers the basics of “entertainment law,” including constitutional, contracts, labor, and employment law and intellectual property rights. Students develop a clear understanding of the applicable laws and how these laws have been applied in the past, how they are applied today, and how they might be amended and applied in the future. Students learn applicable legal concepts, practical insights, and an appreciation of how to deal with lawyers and the law in their entertainment business futures. It is intended to provide a good conceptual understanding of the law and demonstrate its relevance through case study, reading, guest speakers, field trips, and intense discussion. The application of the law to the “digital now,” the “digital future,” and the Internet—now crucial, indeed central, to any discussion of entertainmentwill be included throughout and be the subject of an entire class toward the end of the course. The “law” to be explored will be constitutional, copyright, trademark, contracts, labor, employment, and remedies and their application to and use within the entertainment business.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom MK 435 Introduction to the Music Business and Music Marketing (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite: Questrom MK 323 Marketing Management, or the equivalent.
    • Survey of the music industry with a focus on understanding its structure and the intersection of business and music. Discusses key areas of music marketing, including opportunities for musicians, such as publicity, advertising, promotion (online and traditional), digital distribution, touring, licensing/synch, and radio.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom SI 438/COM FT 438 Talent Representation, Management, and Contracts (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite for BU Questrom students: Questrom OB 221.
    • Prerequisite for non-Boston University students: Organizational Behavior.
    • No prerequisite for BU COM students.
    • Participants in this course will be offered a rare, hands-on opportunity to peer behind the historically closed doors of talent agencies, personal management companies, entertainment law firms, and other representation team members. Utilizing case studies and business models, the class members will examine the manner in which these critical players interact and attempt to work together on behalf of clients. Participants will gain an understanding of the different areas of talent representation, how each one functions in the scope of a client’s career, and what the position responsibilities are in each area of representation. Readings and research projects will focus on current approaches to negotiation.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom FE 430 Entertainment Finance (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite: Questrom FE 323 Financial Management, or the equivalent.
    • Entertainment Finance examines financial structures and decisions in entertainment and media realms, including feature film, television, music, live performance, sports, digital media, and related business endeavors. The course covers the various ways entertainment and media companies raise capital, budget capital, and manage return on investment to shareholders and other stakeholders. Students study business models within each segment to understand the financial, operational, and legal constraints and best practices under which media and entertainment firms operate.
    • Syllabus
Elective Courses

Students choose two of the following elective courses:

  • Questrom LA 430 Entertainment Law (4 credits)
    • Recommended for BU students: Questrom LA 245
    • Recommended for non-Boston University students: Introduction to Business Law
    • This survey class covers the basics of “entertainment law,” including constitutional, contracts, labor, and employment law and intellectual property rights. Students develop a clear understanding of the applicable laws and how these laws have been applied in the past, how they are applied today, and how they might be amended and applied in the future. Students learn applicable legal concepts, practical insights, and an appreciation of how to deal with lawyers and the law in their entertainment business futures. It is intended to provide a good conceptual understanding of the law and demonstrate its relevance through case study, reading, guest speakers, field trips, and intense discussion. The application of the law to the “digital now,” the “digital future,” and the Internet—now crucial, indeed central, to any discussion of entertainmentwill be included throughout and be the subject of an entire class toward the end of the course. The “law” to be explored will be constitutional, copyright, trademark, contracts, labor, employment, and remedies and their application to and use within the entertainment business.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom MK 435 Introduction to the Music Business and Music Marketing (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite: Questrom MK 323 Marketing Management, or the equivalent.
    • Survey of the music industry with a focus on understanding its structure and the intersection of business and music. Discusses key areas of music marketing, including opportunities for musicians, such as publicity, advertising, promotion (online and traditional), digital distribution, touring, licensing/synch, and radio.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom SI 438/COM FT 438 Talent Representation, Management, and Contracts (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite for BU Questrom students: Questrom OB 221.
    • Prerequisite for non-Boston University students: Organizational Behavior.
    • No prerequisite for BU COM students.
    • Participants in this course will be offered a rare, hands-on opportunity to peer behind the historically closed doors of talent agencies, personal management companies, entertainment law firms, and other representation team members. Utilizing case studies and business models, the class members will examine the manner in which these critical players interact and attempt to work together on behalf of clients. Participants will gain an understanding of the different areas of talent representation, how each one functions in the scope of a client’s career, and what the position responsibilities are in each area of representation. Readings and research projects will focus on current approaches to negotiation.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom FE 430 Entertainment Finance (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite: Questrom FE 323 Financial Management, or the equivalent.
    • Entertainment Finance examines financial structures and decisions in entertainment and media realms, including feature film, television, music, live performance, sports, digital media, and related business endeavors. The course covers the various ways entertainment and media companies raise capital, budget capital, and manage return on investment to shareholders and other stakeholders. Students study business models within each segment to understand the financial, operational, and legal constraints and best practices under which media and entertainment firms operate.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 563 Entertainment Marketing (4)
    • This course surveys the strategy, techniques, and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create, and distribute video, film, print, interactive, and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research, and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 564 Entertainment Promotion: Speaker Series (4)
    • The course will showcase agents, managers, publicists, and studio executives, among others, who will discuss their role and real-life experience in developing and guiding an entertainment project (be it a movie, play, book, or music) to success. The course surveys the nuts-and-bolts of taking an entertainment project from the ground up with emphasis on doing so in the digital age of the 21st century.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 566 A1: The Business of Hollywood (4)
    • A practical analysis of the film and television industries. A general overview of the business of entertainment and the balancing act between art and commerce. How to evaluate, acquire, develop, package, promote, sell, finance, produce, and market motion picture and television product. Where to begin, how to apply what you’ve learned in the classroom to the marketplace, and how to land your first and second jobs. Understanding the personalities and social constructs of the industry and how to navigate your way through the industry and make a career for yourself in film and television.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 585 Careers in Hollywood (4)
    • A series of symposium-like evenings with industry professionals speaking primarily on those topics covered in COM FT 566E A1 The Business of Hollywood. Some classes will reflect topics covered in COM FT 584 Creative Life in Television. Students will be given the opportunity for up close and personal interaction with some of the industry’s movers and shakers. An opportunity to network with industry alumni as well as non-alumni professionals.
    • Syllabus
Internship Course

Study the current economic, political, and social issues affecting the entertainment industry. Internship placements have included Paramount Pictures Finance Department, Essential Entertainment, Shine-Reveille, Fox Sports, NBC-Universal, and Lionsgate Legal Department.

  • Please note that these are examples of past internship placements only. While BU International Programs guarantees an internship to program participants, specific placements vary from semester to semester and may not always be available. Likewise, internship placements may be available in academic areas not listed.
  • Syllabus
Film & Television Track

Course information for the Film & Television track:

Required Courses

Students take the following two courses:

  • COM FT 566 The Business of Hollywood (4 credits)
    • A practical analysis of the film and television industries. A general overview of the business of entertainment and the balancing act between art and commerce. How to evaluate, acquire, develop, package, promote, sell, finance, produce, and market motion picture and television product. Where to begin, how to apply what you’ve learned in the classroom to the marketplace, and how to land your first and second jobs. Understanding the personalities and social constructs of the industry and how to navigate your way through the industry and make a career for yourself in film and television.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 585 Careers in Hollywood (4)
    • A series of symposium-like evenings with industry professionals speaking primarily on those topics covered in COM FT 566E A1 The Business of Hollywood. Some classes will reflect topics covered in COM FT 584 Creative Life in Television. Students will be given the opportunity for up close and personal interaction with some of the industry’s movers and shakers. An opportunity to network with industry alumni as well as non-alumni professionals.
    • Syllabus
Elective Courses

Students choose one elective course:

  • COM CM 563 Entertainment Marketing (4 credits)
    • This course surveys the strategy, techniques, and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create, and distribute video, film, print, interactive, and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research, and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 564 Entertainment Promotion: Speaker Series (4)
    • The course will showcase agents, managers, publicists, and studio executives, among others, who will discuss their role and real-life experience in developing and guiding an entertainment project (be it a movie, play, book, or music) to success. The course surveys the nuts-and-bolts of taking an entertainment project from the ground up with emphasis on doing so in the digital age of the 21st century.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 539 Professional Production Methods (4)
    • To introduce film and television students to professional-quality production techniques, suppliers, and equipment through field trips and speakers in the PLB classroom, and at film and video shoots, vendors, and post-production facilities. The class will primarily consist of required excursions; it will also include lectures, guest speakers, screenings, class discussions, and demonstrations. The class meetings will be informal, striving for an open exchange of ideas, points of view, experiences, and difficulties encountered in film and video production. Students are encouraged to participate in an open forum of discussions regarding techniques, problems encountered related to directing and producing skills, and so forth. We also discuss potential solutions to problems, some of which are routinely encountered in the film industry.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 584 The Creative Life in Television (4)
    • Prerequisite: This course is open to COM students or those who have taken and passed a course in communications, creative writing, theater or film studies, acting, or literary study at the college level. This course is oriented to students who have a solid background in television and in the industry and is not an introductory course.
    • This course will follow the life and death of a television season. We examine what makes it on the air, why it gets there, who creates it, who sells it, who buys it, and who is going to pay for it. We look at the cultural, political, and commercial forces that shape the creative environment. The course examines the struggle of the networks to survive in a rapidly changing environment and in the face of new technologies. And as the dinosaurs die, we look at the new opportunities this era of change offers for fresh talent.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom MK 435 Introduction to the Music Business and Music Marketing (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite: Questrom MK 323 Marketing Management, or the equivalent.
    • Survey of the music industry with a focus on understanding of its structure and the intersection of business and music. Discusses key areas of music marketing, including opportunities for musicians, such as publicity, advertising, promotion (online and traditional), digital distribution, touring, licensing/synch, and radio.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom SI 438/COM FT 438 Talent Representation, Management, and Contracts (4)
    • Spring only
    • Prerequisite for BU Questrom students: Questrom OB 221.
    • Prerequisite for non-Boston University students: Organizational Behavior.
    • No prerequisite for BU COM students.
    • Participants in this course will be offered a rare, hands-on opportunity to peer behind the historically closed doors of talent agencies, personal management companies, entertainment law firms, and other representation team members. Utilizing case studies and business models, the class members will examine the manner in which these critical players interact and attempt to work together on behalf of clients. Participants will gain an understanding of the different areas of talent representation, how each one functions in the scope of a client’s career and what the position responsibilities are in each area of representation. Readings and research projects will focus on current approaches to negotiation.
    • Syllabus
Internship Course

Study communications and society and work for one of Los Angeles’s television networks or film production companies. Past internship placements have included CBS-TV, The Weinstein Company, HBO Films, Paramount Vantage, E!, Warner Bros., The Directors Bureau, Fox Broadcasting, General Hospital, and the Donners' Company.

  • Please note that these are examples of past internship placements only. While BU Study Abroad guarantees an internship to program participants, specific placements vary from semester to semester and may not always be available. Likewise, internship placements may be available in academic areas not listed.
  • Syllabus

The Global Learning Experience: An Online Course

Students in all Fall and Spring programs have the opportunity to enroll in The Global Learning Experience at no additional cost.

  • CAS IP101 The Global Learning Experience (1 credit)
    • All program participants have the opportunity to make the most of their semester abroad with The Global Learning Experience, a self-paced, Pass/Fail course with brief readings and experiential assignments that accompany them while living and studying in a country and culture different from their own. Students post their work, experiences and observations to an online platform to trace and articulate their achievements abroad from an academic, personal and professional standpoint. The course links students with the faculty instructors as well as peers studying on other BU Study Abroad programs around the world. Students earn one credit in addition to the total program credits mentioned below at no additional cost.
    • Syllabus
Program Residence 

  • Students share furnished apartments at the Park LaBrea Apartments in Los Angeles.
  • The apartments have two bedrooms with two occupants per bedroom. Each apartment has a shared kitchen stocked with cooking utensils.
  • Singles are available on a space-available basis for a supplemental fee.
  • Students have full access to amenities offered through this centrally located apartment complex.
  • Although board is not included, students can easily walk to nearby grocery stores and restaurants.
  • The apartments have on-site laundry facilities.
  • Fall Semester: Late August to early December
    • Spring Semester: Early January to late April
    • Fall Semester: March 15
    • Spring Semester: October 2