The London History & Literature Program, offered during the fall, is open to all students but especially designed for those studying English and history. Students take classes at the centrally located BU London Academic Center and have one required class and one research seminar in their chosen field (English or history). The program will help students learn how to conduct advanced research projects and introduce them to the best modern scholarship in their fields—a unique opportunity for students considering advanced study in English or history.

  • Priority will be given to qualified upperclassmen.
  • Please note that a visa is not required for US & Canadian passport holders, but if you are a citizen of another country you may require a visa.
  • Admissions requirements for all programs
Students have one required class and one research seminar in their chosen field (English or history). They will also take two electives, for a total of 16 credits.

English Literature Track

Students on the English Literature Track are required to take the following class and research seminar.

  • CAS EN 340 Visionary Capital: The Writing of London (4 credits)
    • Using a selection of poems, plays, and novels, class explores the imaginative potential of London. Close attention to specific historical development in relation to works by authors from Spencer to McEwan.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 391 Research Seminar in the Literature of London (4)
    • Course aims to give an informed sense of the variety of ways available in pursuing interpretation and evaluation of literary texts. Texts in question will all involve the exploration of various aspects of the city of London.
    • Syllabus

Students choose one "Elective A" course for the first part of the semester, and one "Elective B" course for the second part of the semester.

  • CAS AH 319 Arts and Media in Britain (4 credits)
    • Formerly CAS IP 406
    • This course is designed as an introduction to the arts in Britain. The course should serve to widen specialists’ knowledge, and to provide non-specialists with an overview. The course should cover core elements on such subjects as funding, institutions, accessibility, and value of British Arts.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS AH 388 British Painting from Holbein to the Twentieth Century (4)
    • Recommended elective for Arts & Arts Administration.
    • This course provides an introduction to British painting, and it is intended for students who have a major or minor in art history. The structure of the course is broadly chronological, covering the sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth. The course offers students the unique opportunity of studying the artworks in London galleries and museums. Enrollment is limited. Donnellan.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 322 Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa (4)
    • Prerequisite: EC 101 or EC 102, or equivalent.
    • Examines the economic structure, institutional evolution, and political configuration in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa. Issues addressed include legacies of the colonial era, the impact of oil, and the problem of industrialization in resource-based economies.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 330/CAS IR 336 European Business Environment: Institutions and Enterprise (4)
    • The European Union is continually evolving. This course addresses key factors and issues facing European businesses, and other firms doing business in the European "single market," including the EU's security environment and its efforts to develop a regional defense economy. It presents an understanding of current (and relevant past) political, economic, security, and social conditions shaping the development of the European Union. During the fall and spring there will be a trip to Brussels, which will include visits to NATO, the European Parliament, and other European institutions. Macdonald.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 346 European Capital Markets (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS EC 102, or the equivalent.
    • Recommended elective for Management & Finance.
    • Familiarizes students with the structure of the European financial system, covering the principal financial markets and institutions, and the analytical concepts and tools that help explain the processes of price formation and the behavior of participants in these markets. The major financial markets the course covers are spot and foreign exchange dealings, the Eurocurrency and Eurobond markets, futures and options, and swaps and options. Essential background theory is combined with an emphasis on actual events and activities of the major players. Pilbeam.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 310 British and Irish Writing: Poetry and the Novel since 1900 (4)
    • Recommended elective for all tracks.
    • This course aims to provide the student with an appreciation of texts selected from a variety of representative and influential modern authors. Students will be provided with requisite contextual information regarding biographical, social, and political backgrounds to assist them with the development of the skills and vocabulary that are needed to foster competent and persuasive literary interpretation.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 387 Writing in Today's Britain: Meet the Writer (4)
    • Formerly CAS IP 406
    • Examines very recent texts of many genres in English, by both new and experienced contemporary writers, in the context of both literary history and the marketplace. Issues include: Freedom of speech, roles of literary agent and editor, literary integrity. Condé.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 249/WS 310 London Women's Social History from Aphra Behn to the Blitz (4)
    • This course examines the lives of women in London over the past three centuries from a social history perspective. Students will study patches of history from the 1660s and up to and including the role of women during the Second World War. One of the aims is to introduce and broaden students' experience of working with primary source materials and London is a splendid resource for students who are interested in this aspect of studying and writing history.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 252 Class, Power and the Making of British Identity (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 326
    • Interdisciplinary study (art, architecture, literature) of the legacy and history of the British self-image. Aims to develop an understanding of Britain’s unique character through study of historical, political, and cultural contexts. Lectures, discussions, and three guided field trips. Thornhill.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS MA 113 Elementary Statistics (4)
    • Priority will be given to Sargent College students enrolled in the Psychology & Health Sciences Track.
    • Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications in social sciences. Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. Please note that students cannot get credit for both CAS MA 113 and CAS MA 115. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS PO 220/CAS IR 335 Britain and Europe—A New Beginning (4)
    • Formerly CAS PO/IR 335
    • Recommended elective for all tracks.
    • Examines the changing social, cultural, political, and economic structures of Britain at the end of the twentieth century. Introduction to current debates about the future of the United Kingdom in its relationship with Europe. Cousins.
    • Syllabus
  • CFA TH 508 Contemporary British Theatre (4)
    • Enrollment limited
    • Formerly CFA DR 507
    • Provides students with access to contemporary British theatre and the critical tools to understand and enjoy theatre from the perspectives of the playbooks and the productions themselves. This course surveys and offers explanation of the major developments that have taken place in British theatre since 1956. Coursework focuses on students' theatre visits, which occur once every week and include both mainstream and fringe theatre productions. The plays are discussed prior to attendance, and students are expected to provide a critique of the works they have seen. Read.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 334 Advertising in the UK (4)
    • Recommended elective for Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations.
    • Examines the structure and organization of UK mass media from a commercial and business perspective. In particular, terrestrial and satellite TV, billboard and transport, newspapers and magazines, and radio and film are examined in a practical advertising context. Evans.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 457 Seminar in Global Promotional Strategies (4)
    • In this course, students will develop a critical appreciation of both the opportunities and challenges associated with the increasing globalization of markets and the rationale for global promotional strategies. Students reflect on both theory and application of international marketing, gaining insights from companies and how they adjust their marketing and promotional strategies to the international macro-environment. Jichev.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 318 British Television Studies (4)
    • Recommended elective for Film & Television.
    • Examines the content and form of British television programs, contrasting it with American programming. Special emphasis is placed on the study of genres and conventions. Genres will focus on drama, news, comedy, consumer affairs, children’s television, sports, and others, and these are explored in the light of Britain’s cultural and political identity. Fanthome.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom FE 449 Corporate Finance Management (4)
    • Prerequisite: FE 323 Financial Management
    • Covers the financial manager's role in obtaining and allocating funds. Includes topics such as cash budgeting, working capital analysis, dividend policy, capital investment analysis, and debt policy as well as their associated risks. Valuation of companies, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy are covered. The course requires using financial models and spreadsheets. Applications are made to current events and everyday business finance problems.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS AH 381 London Architecture & Urbanism (4 credits)
    • Free elective open to all tracks and is also track-specific elective for the Arts track.
    • This course aims to provide an introduction to the history of London and its buildings. The growth of the city as a historical phenomenon, covering early-modern London to the present day and the development of various architectural styles will be discussed in the context of social, political, economic, and social change. The course is aimed at a wide audience rather than architectural specialists, although some familiarity with British history is helpful. Donnellan, Evenden, Scott, and Turvil.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 357 Modern British Drama: A Critic's Perspective (4)
    • Students enrolled in TH 440 are not permitted to take this course.
    • Offers a broad critical study of the major developments in British drama over the past 50 years. Through the eyes of a leading theater reviewer, the work of specific playwrights is analyzed in detail, and students are expected to produce written and oral critical analyses of plays read and observed during the course. Sierz.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 368 Seminar in Shakespeare Studies (4)
    • This course aims to provide the student with an appreciation of the nature of Shakespeare’s achievement through the study of four plays in class sessions and the option of reading one other play that the student may choose for his or her directed study. The sessions will naturally involve some discussion of the general background of Shakespeare and his works, with time being devoted to the various thematic, structural, and historical issues that arise from a study of his plays. For the greater part of the course, however, time in class will be devoted to a close critical reading of various sections of the plays in order to give the student the opportunity to gain an intimate understanding of the verbal and dramatic qualities of Shakespeare’s genius, and of the myriad ways in which meanings are expressed through the language, imagery, structure, and dramatic possibilities of the works themselves.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 388 Contemporary British Literature (4)
    • Formerly CAS IP 403
    • Through the intensive study of several recent literary texts students will learn more about the British psyche, culture, and history that generated them. They will hopefully be confronted with some of the most important aspects of the human condition, both in a sense of that condition as peculiarly British and as a generality. Charalambides.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 243/CAS IR 392 Britain and the European Question: The Confluence of History and Politics (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 255/CAS IR 392
    • This course provides an overview of Britain's relations with Europe between 1945 and 1992 in the context of ongoing debates concerning national sovereignty and national modernization, losing an empire and maintaining a world role, and the "special relationship" with the United States. Thornhill.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 250 British Youth Culture from 1950 to the Present (4)
    • Prerequisite: completion of one university-level History course, or one university-level Sociology course.
    • Course looks at the impact of black and white cultures of America on Britain; also the influence of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and British folk traditions, in the context of social change in the second half of the 20th century. Weight.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 251 Cultural Capital: The History of Popular Culture in London (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 320
    • Prerequisite as of fall 2010: one undergraduate-level History course.
    • Traces the development of popular culture in London from the late eighteenth century to the present. Concerned with popular cultural "texts" as well as popular cultural sites. Organized chronologically, from the early origins of modern culture to the present. Peplar.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS PO 223 Issues in Contemporary Politics (4)
    • Formerly CAS PO 358
    • Designed to place in context British/EU political and trade relations; crime, punishment, and social justice; race and nationalism; fascism and the extreme right today; feminism, sexuality, and women in politics; Anglo-American problems of public administration; and pressure groups, the police, and industrial relations. Sullivan.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 317 British Cinema and Society (4)
    • This course offers a combined social history and technological survey of British film making since World War II. The selected films provide vivid points of departure for an understanding of how British society has evolved. The course surveys the changing nature of modern British culture and society, using the products of the British movie industry as the main source of evidence. Most films fall outside of the category of British films that have made an impact in the United States market. Students will witness the cinematic version of the "other side" of Britain. One of the main themes of this "other side" is social class, which sets the agenda for most of the themes explored in the class. Special attention is also given to the differences between cinematic and historical versions of such themes. Dodson.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 344 European Cinema: From Festival Circuit to the Big Screen (4)
    • This course examines the economics and cultural politics of contemporary European cinema and what they reveal about national identity, culture, language, and values. The course considers the globalization process from film festival to global marketplace, and includes visits to local festivals and guest lectures.
    • Syllabus
English History Track

Students on the English History Track are required to take the following class and research seminar.

  • CAS HI 246 London: Imperial City to World City (4 credits)
    • Formerly CAS HI 303
    • Course aims to introduce students to the social, economic and cultural history of London since 1666, focusing on how London developed from being the modest-sized capital city of England to capital of the British Empire and world’s largest city.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 432 Research Seminar and Tutorial in English History (4)
    • Seminar considers the relationship between the past and the present, and surveys the evolution of key historiographical trends in modern English history. Includes research methods, lectures and an upper level undergraduate research paper using primary and secondary evidence.
    • Syllabus

Students choose one "Elective A" course for the first part of the semester, and one "Elective B" course for the second part of the semester.

  • CAS AH 319Arts and Media in Britain (4 credits)
    • Formerly CAS IP 406
    • This course is designed as an introduction to the arts in Britain. The course should serve to widen specialists’ knowledge, and to provide non-specialists with an overview. The course should cover core elements on such subjects as funding, institutions, accessibility, and value of British Arts.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS AH 388British Painting from Holbein to the Twentieth Century (4)
    • Recommended elective for Arts & Arts Administration.
    • This course provides an introduction to British painting, and it is intended for students who have a major or minor in art history. The structure of the course is broadly chronological, covering the sixteenth century to the end of the nineteenth. The course offers students the unique opportunity of studying the artworks in London galleries and museums. Enrollment is limited. Donnellan.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 322Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa (4)
    • Prerequisite: EC 101 or EC 102, or equivalent.
    • Examines the economic structure, institutional evolution, and political configuration in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa. Issues addressed include legacies of the colonial era, the impact of oil, and the problem of industrialization in resource-based economies.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 330/CAS IR 336European Business Environment: Institutions and Enterprise (4)
    • The European Union is continually evolving. This course addresses key factors and issues facing European businesses, and other firms doing business in the European "single market," including the EU's security environment and its efforts to develop a regional defense economy. It presents an understanding of current (and relevant past) political, economic, security, and social conditions shaping the development of the European Union. During the fall and spring there will be a trip to Brussels, which will include visits to NATO, the European Parliament, and other European institutions. Macdonald.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EC 346European Capital Markets (4)
    • Prerequisite: CAS EC 102, or the equivalent.
    • Recommended elective for Management & Finance.
    • Familiarizes students with the structure of the European financial system, covering the principal financial markets and institutions, and the analytical concepts and tools that help explain the processes of price formation and the behavior of participants in these markets. The major financial markets the course covers are spot and foreign exchange dealings, the Eurocurrency and Eurobond markets, futures and options, and swaps and options. Essential background theory is combined with an emphasis on actual events and activities of the major players. Pilbeam.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 310British and Irish Writing: Poetry and the Novel since 1900 (4)
    • Recommended elective for all tracks.
    • This course aims to provide the student with an appreciation of texts selected from a variety of representative and influential modern authors. Students will be provided with requisite contextual information regarding biographical, social, and political backgrounds to assist them with the development of the skills and vocabulary that are needed to foster competent and persuasive literary interpretation.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 387Writing in Today's Britain: Meet the Writer (4)
    • Formerly CAS IP 406
    • Examines very recent texts of many genres in English, by both new and experienced contemporary writers, in the context of both literary history and the marketplace. Issues include: Freedom of speech, roles of literary agent and editor, literary integrity. Condé.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 249/WS 310London Women's Social History from Aphra Behn to the Blitz (4)
    • This course examines the lives of women in London over the past three centuries from a social history perspective. Students will study patches of history from the 1660s and up to and including the role of women during the Second World War. One of the aims is to introduce and broaden students' experience of working with primary source materials and London is a splendid resource for students who are interested in this aspect of studying and writing history.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 252Class, Power and the Making of British Identity (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 326
    • Interdisciplinary study (art, architecture, literature) of the legacy and history of the British self-image. Aims to develop an understanding of Britain’s unique character through study of historical, political, and cultural contexts. Lectures, discussions, and three guided field trips. Thornhill.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS MA 113Elementary Statistics (4)
    • Priority will be given to Sargent College students enrolled in the Psychology & Health Sciences Track.
    • Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications in social sciences. Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. Please note that students cannot get credit for both CAS MA 113 and CAS MA 115. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS PO 220/CAS IR 335Britain and Europe—A New Beginning (4)
    • Formerly CAS PO/IR 335
    • Recommended elective for all tracks.
    • Examines the changing social, cultural, political, and economic structures of Britain at the end of the twentieth century. Introduction to current debates about the future of the United Kingdom in its relationship with Europe. Cousins.
    • Syllabus
  • CFA TH 508Contemporary British Theatre (4)
    • Enrollment limited
    • Formerly CFA DR 507
    • Provides students with access to contemporary British theatre and the critical tools to understand and enjoy theatre from the perspectives of the playbooks and the productions themselves. This course surveys and offers explanation of the major developments that have taken place in British theatre since 1956. Coursework focuses on students' theatre visits, which occur once every week and include both mainstream and fringe theatre productions. The plays are discussed prior to attendance, and students are expected to provide a critique of the works they have seen. Read.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 334Advertising in the UK (4)
    • Recommended elective for Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations.
    • Examines the structure and organization of UK mass media from a commercial and business perspective. In particular, terrestrial and satellite TV, billboard and transport, newspapers and magazines, and radio and film are examined in a practical advertising context. Evans.
    • Syllabus
  • COM CM 457Seminar in Global Promotional Strategies (4)
    • In this course, students will develop a critical appreciation of both the opportunities and challenges associated with the increasing globalization of markets and the rationale for global promotional strategies. Students reflect on both theory and application of international marketing, gaining insights from companies and how they adjust their marketing and promotional strategies to the international macro-environment. Jichev.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 318British Television Studies (4)
    • Recommended elective for Film & Television.
    • Examines the content and form of British television programs, contrasting it with American programming. Special emphasis is placed on the study of genres and conventions. Genres will focus on drama, news, comedy, consumer affairs, children’s television, sports, and others, and these are explored in the light of Britain’s cultural and political identity. Fanthome.
    • Syllabus
  • Questrom FE 449Corporate Finance Management (4)
    • Prerequisite: FE 323 Financial Management
    • Covers the financial manager's role in obtaining and allocating funds. Includes topics such as cash budgeting, working capital analysis, dividend policy, capital investment analysis, and debt policy as well as their associated risks. Valuation of companies, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy are covered. The course requires using financial models and spreadsheets. Applications are made to current events and everyday business finance problems.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS AH 381London Architecture & Urbanism (4 credits)
    • Free elective open to all tracks and is also track-specific elective for the Arts track.
    • This course aims to provide an introduction to the history of London and its buildings. The growth of the city as a historical phenomenon, covering early-modern London to the present day and the development of various architectural styles will be discussed in the context of social, political, economic, and social change. The course is aimed at a wide audience rather than architectural specialists, although some familiarity with British history is helpful. Donnellan, Evenden, Scott, and Turvil.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 357Modern British Drama: A Critic's Perspective (4)
    • Students enrolled in TH 440 are not permitted to take this course.
    • Offers a broad critical study of the major developments in British drama over the past 50 years. Through the eyes of a leading theater reviewer, the work of specific playwrights is analyzed in detail, and students are expected to produce written and oral critical analyses of plays read and observed during the course. Sierz.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 368Seminar in Shakespeare Studies (4)
    • This course aims to provide the student with an appreciation of the nature of Shakespeare’s achievement through the study of four plays in class sessions and the option of reading one other play that the student may choose for his or her directed study. The sessions will naturally involve some discussion of the general background of Shakespeare and his works, with time being devoted to the various thematic, structural, and historical issues that arise from a study of his plays. For the greater part of the course, however, time in class will be devoted to a close critical reading of various sections of the plays in order to give the student the opportunity to gain an intimate understanding of the verbal and dramatic qualities of Shakespeare’s genius, and of the myriad ways in which meanings are expressed through the language, imagery, structure, and dramatic possibilities of the works themselves.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS EN 388Contemporary British Literature (4)
    • Formerly CAS IP 403
    • Through the intensive study of several recent literary texts students will learn more about the British psyche, culture, and history that generated them. They will hopefully be confronted with some of the most important aspects of the human condition, both in a sense of that condition as peculiarly British and as a generality. Charalambides.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 243/CAS IR 392Britain and the European Question: The Confluence of History and Politics (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 255/CAS IR 392
    • This course provides an overview of Britain's relations with Europe between 1945 and 1992 in the context of ongoing debates concerning national sovereignty and national modernization, losing an empire and maintaining a world role, and the "special relationship" with the United States. Thornhill.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 250British Youth Culture from 1950 to the Present (4)
    • Prerequisite: completion of one university-level History course, or one university-level Sociology course.
    • Course looks at the impact of black and white cultures of America on Britain; also the influence of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and British folk traditions, in the context of social change in the second half of the 20th century. Weight.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS HI 251Cultural Capital: The History of Popular Culture in London (4)
    • Formerly CAS HI 320
    • Prerequisite as of fall 2010: one undergraduate-level History course.
    • Traces the development of popular culture in London from the late eighteenth century to the present. Concerned with popular cultural "texts" as well as popular cultural sites. Organized chronologically, from the early origins of modern culture to the present. Peplar.
    • Syllabus
  • CAS PO 223Issues in Contemporary Politics (4)
    • Formerly CAS PO 358
    • Designed to place in context British/EU political and trade relations; crime, punishment, and social justice; race and nationalism; fascism and the extreme right today; feminism, sexuality, and women in politics; Anglo-American problems of public administration; and pressure groups, the police, and industrial relations. Sullivan.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 317British Cinema and Society (4)
    • This course offers a combined social history and technological survey of British film making since World War II. The selected films provide vivid points of departure for an understanding of how British society has evolved. The course surveys the changing nature of modern British culture and society, using the products of the British movie industry as the main source of evidence. Most films fall outside of the category of British films that have made an impact in the United States market. Students will witness the cinematic version of the "other side" of Britain. One of the main themes of this "other side" is social class, which sets the agenda for most of the themes explored in the class. Special attention is also given to the differences between cinematic and historical versions of such themes. Dodson.
    • Syllabus
  • COM FT 344 European Cinema: From Festival Circuit to the Big Screen (4)
    • This course examines the economics and cultural politics of contemporary European cinema and what they reveal about national identity, culture, language, and values. The course considers the globalization process from film festival to global marketplace, and includes visits to local festivals and guest lectures.
    • Syllabus

The Global Learning Experience: An Online Course

Students in all Fall and Spring programs have the opportunity to enroll in The Global Learning Experience at no additional cost.

  • CAS IP101: The Global Learning Experience (1 credit)
    • All program participants have the opportunity to make the most of their semester abroad with The Global Learning Experience, a self-paced, Pass/Fail course with brief readings and experiential assignments that accompany them while living and studying in a country and culture different from their own. Students post their work, experiences and observations to an online platform to trace and articulate their achievements abroad from an academic, personal and professional standpoint. The course links students with the faculty instructors as well as peers studying on other BU Study Abroad programs around the world. Students earn one credit in addition to the total program credits mentioned below at no additional cost.
Program Residences

  • Accommodations are apartment-style suites in BU’s own housing in the centrally located South Kensington neighborhood. All residences are approximately a 15-minute walk from the BU London Academic Center. Bedrooms consist of doubles, triples, and quads and all bedrooms come with an en suite bathroom. Limited single rooms are available on a space-available basis for a supplemental fee.
  • Fully equipped kitchens are available within BU housing. Kitchens are shared between approximately 6-14 students.
  • Students are responsible for budgeting their own cost of meals. Board isn’t included in this program.
  • BU London does not have dining hall facilities, but there are ample grocery stores, restaurants, and other amenities in the immediate area surrounding the residences.
  • All buildings are within walking distance to local transportation, including the London Tube and bus systems.
  • Coin-operated laundry facilities are located in the basements of all residences. Cost of laundry is not included in the program fee.
  • Students have access to the BU London Library for research and printing purposes. For recreational and social activities, students may take advantage of the BU London Social Programme as well as the clubs and societies of Imperial College London.
  • WiFi is available throughout all the BU buildings.
  • Fall Semester: late August to mid-December

    Please note: This program is only offered during the fall semester.

    • Fall Semester: March 15