Dublin Internship Program (Summer)

The Dublin Summer Internship Program offers eight weeks of coursework in a single liberal arts course and participation in a professional internship in or near Dublin. Excursions to cultural and historical sites complement the coursework.

Program Curriculum

Students enroll in one required course and one internship course. Each course carries four Boston University credits. Students must enroll for a total of eight credits. Note: Syllabi are for course approval and reference only. Students will receive up-to-date syllabi when their courses begin.

Required Courses

Students enroll in one of the following courses:

CAS EC 372: The Irish Economy (4 credits)

Explores the history of Irish economic development and analyzes the current economy’s main strengths and weaknesses, considering factors such as government policy and regulation, taxation, welfare, international trade, and the role of the EU. Includes guest speakers and field visits. Dowling. Syllabus

CAS HI 325/PO 231: The History of Ireland (4)

(Formerly CAS HI 325/PO 381.) This course provides an introduction to the trends, themes, and debates that have shaped modern Irish history. Each lecture focuses on one or two themes in the history of modern Ireland, examining the background to these themes and investigating the impact they have had on Irish society. The course primarily focuses on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but where necessary events in earlier centuries are referred to and explained. Among the topics examined are Ireland’s relationship with Britain, the constitutional and revolutionary traditions in Irish nationalism, the political and economic development of the Republic, the role of religion in the independent Irish state, the Northern Ireland “Troubles,” and the role of sport in Irish culture. Connolly. Syllabus

CAS IR 306: International Human Rights Law (4)

Examines the history, development, structure, and efficacy of the international human rights law framework. Emphasis on the United Nations and on regional systems with regard to the promotion and protection of human rights. Lectures, discussions, and group exercises. Smyth. Syllabus

CAS SO 341: Contemporary Irish Society (4)

This course provides students with an understanding of modern Ireland, its people, and its role in the 21st century. The course starts with a brief overview of Ireland’s location in the world and a snapshot of those strands of Irish history that contribute to the character of the modern nation. Topics covered include political structures, including the Constitution, the system of government, and the political party system; the social structure of Irish society, including demography, emigration/immigration, class, family, and the urban/rural divide; and social government in Ireland, including the education system, religion, popular culture, social protection, and health. Byrne. Syllabus

SMG FE 445: Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (4)

Required for Finance concentrators. Introduction to the investment management process. Defining investment objectives and constraints. Introduction to Modern Portfolio Theory, CAPM, APT, Efficient Markets, stock and bond valuation models. Immunizing interest-rate risk. Active vs. passive investment strategies, fundamental vs. technical analysis, trading practices, and performance evaluation. Introduction to the role of futures and options in hedging and speculation. Students are expected to become familiar with current events in the financial news.

Internship Courses

The course number will depend on the area of specialization in which the student completes his or her internship. Syllabus

  • CAS AH 505 Internship in Arts/Arts Administration
  • CAS EC 497 Internship in Business/Economics
  • CAS HU 425 Internship in the Visual/Performing Arts
  • CAS PO 401 Internship in Politics
  • CAS PO 403 Internship in Comparative Law
  • CAS PO 405/IR 455 Internship in International Organizations
  • CAS PS 495 Internship in Health/Human Services
  • COM CM 471 Internship in Advertising/Marketing/Public Relations
  • COM FT 493/494 Internship in Film/Radio/Television
  • COM JO 411 Internship in Journalism
  • SAR HS 405 Practicum in the Health Sciences
  • SHA HF 390 Field Placement in Hospitality Administration
Internship Components
  • Paper relating to professional field of internship placement
  • Attendance and participation in seminars
  • Internship supervisor’s evaluation

Internship Areas

Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations

Work in marketing, public relations, design, and presentation for specific advertising agencies or public relations departments of larger organizations. Past internship placements have included McConnell’s Advertising Service, Quintessentially, and Presence Communications.

Arts & Arts Administration

Work in music, dance, literature, architecture, education, visual arts, or multimedia for architectural firms, museums, theaters, performing companies, or galleries. Past internship placements have included the James Joyce Centre, The Science Gallery, the National Museum of Ireland, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Improvised Music Company.

Film/Radio/Television

Work in writing, research, and broadcasting for radio and television stations, or film and production companies. Though the Irish media market is small by American standards, past internship placements have included Gillian Reynolds Casting, TV3, City Channel, ESPN America, and NewsTalk FM.

Business & Economics

Work in the finance, accounting, legal, marketing, information technology and telecommunications, and research departments of Irish or multinational corporations as well as smaller, specialized firms. Past internship placements have included Ulster Bank, Citco, Cúram Software, JP Morgan, Free Wireless Hotspot, Bella the Makeover, and XS Direct.

Health & Human Services

Work in hospital rehabilitation, therapy, or education programs; health center administration; social service departments; community care centers; or social activist organizations. Past internship placements have included the Royal Hospital Donnybrook, the Coombe Women’s Hospital, the Solas Centre, James Connolly Memorial Hospital, Beaumont Hospital, and Release Speech Therapy.

Hospitality Administration

Work in the hospitality industry in such fields as hotel and restaurant management or event management. Past internship placements have included the Four Seasons Hotel, Xena Productions, and The Helix.

Journalism

Work in writing, research, design, marketing, and production for magazines, newspapers, or small publishing houses. Past internship placements have included Hot Press, The Irish Dependent, and Golf Digest.

Politics/International Relations

Work with an NGO, the press, humanitarian organizations, or a political party. Past internship placements have included the Institute of European Affairs, Fine Gael, Amnesty International, The European Movement, the Department of Foreign Affairs, and Fianna Fáil.

Pre-Law

Work in research and documentation for local Dublin law firms specializing in civil, criminal, or corporate law. Past internship placements have included Philip Lee & Associates, HSBC, Terence Lyons & Co Solicitors, and the Free Legal Advice Centre.

Program Details

Requirements
Program Dates
  • Summer Term: Early June to early August
Cost
Credits
  • Upon successful completion of the program, students earn eight Boston University credits. Students must enroll for a total of eight credits.
Housing
  • Students are housed in suite-style accommodations on or adjacent to the campus of Dublin City University (DCU) in double rooms. Each bedroom is equipped with Internet access, a television, a study desk, and its own bathroom. The suites feature kitchenettes and seating areas, and are in close proximity to BU’s administrative offices, the DCU library, bookstore, and athletic facilities.
Application Deadlines
  • Summer Term: March 1

Download a description of the Dublin Summer Internship Program.

Program Faculty & Staff

The Boston University Dublin Programs are administered by staff in both our Boston and Dublin offices. In Boston, a program manager facilitates the admissions and pre-departure procedures, and maintains contact with students prior to their arrival in Dublin. The Boston office also houses administrative personnel who are responsible for everyday operations. In Dublin the staff comprises administrative, academic, and housing personnel.