Graphic Design in London 2010

View all of the Graphic Design in London student work galleries.

Students at Work: Baseline Magazine and Workshops

Baseline welcomed Professor Richard B. Doubleday and his design students from Boston University to Bradbourne House in East Malling, Kent where the studio is based. Baseline was proud to host the 7th annual visit by Prof. Richard B. Doubleday (author of articles in Baseline 49, 53, and 54). Hans Dieter Reichert, editor and publisher, talked about Baseline’s history and philosophy before handing over to designer staff of HDR visual communication. The designers Chloe Wooldridge, Mané Branco and Johnathon Hunt explained in some details their unique approach to the design of the individual articles. The students appreciated the ‘whole Baseline experience’ – the exchange of ideas, views and opinions and after a final tour through the studio the guest left for London. The next visit by Prof. Richard B. Doubleday and his students from Boston University is already pencilled for the next year (2011).

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Typetour: Walking tour of London Letters

The tour led by John Voller, a certified City of London Guide, started at Old Street underground station, close to St Luke’s Church the burial place of The House of Caslon, that great dynasty of English typefounders. The tour takes in other typographic landmarks with a Caslon connection including Helmet Row, Whitecross Street and Chiswell Street the site of the the Calson Foundry. Alongside sites of typefounding interest the tour also highlighted some of the most beautiful lettering found in the City of London including the Roman inscriptions in Wakefield Gardens and Simon Patersons fabulous Carpet of Words.

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Assignment 1: Structures in the City

How does structures influence our daily living, our way of thinking, our perceptions, our way of looking as graphic designers? What kinds of structures do we experience in our immediate surroundings within London. What structures are obvious, hidden, or invisible?

To find answers to these questions, students participated in a two-day workshop conducted by the German graphic designer and educator Armin Knoll.

The objective of the workshop was take a closer look at structures within the urban context of London. Knoll gave each student a miniature human figure, to explore this idea of structure and think about size relationships and our perception of scale. Following an introductory slide lecture, he then asked them to conceptualize, juxtapose and utilize gathered material and create new designs in the context of a specific structures within London.

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Assignment 2: London Concept Book

The objective of the assignment was to take a closer look at the personality of London. Doubleday challenged the students to think about how living in or visiting a city influences how we think and what we see. He asked the students to create short, multi-page books integrating images of London that would visually communicate the visual culture of the city. Doubleday asked the students to think about how the visual concept fits the mood and temperament of the subject matter; the student’s experiences and impressions of London from their point of view. Doubleday calls this approach a cultural concept book study.

To carry out the project the students collected images from London by various methods such as hand drawings, painting, and digital photography. The students scanned and photocopied the London material. The students were asked to consider integrating typography and explore alternative methods of visualizing narration: continuous text, typographic expression, diagrammatic representation, timeline or map construction, and text/image combinations. Each student also focused on the cinematic aspects of multi-page design, unity, pacing, contrast, and rhythm. The final designs comprised a series of cultural concept books.

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